CNET Reports Intel to Enter Connected Home Market, Jason Hope Comments

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Intel's recently announced agreement to purchase Lantiq shows its desire to enter the connected home marketplace, CNET reports. Jason Hope believes the merger shows promise as the computer giant takes strides to enter a new niche.

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The Lantiq purchase," says Jason Hope, "shows how many tech firms, like Intel, are looking to get into the connected 'smart home' market. It's not surprising, with the potential income available in this market.

Intel has made an agreement to buy Lantiq, a Munich-based home networking and broadband chips company. With this move, CNET.com indicates that Intel will be making one of its first advances into the connected home market. Jason Hope, Arizona entrepreneur and philanthropist, believes this could be a promising merger.

CNET.com's Ben Fox Rubin reported on February 2 in an article entitled "Intel eyes connected homes with Lantiq purchase" that the purchase of Lantiq could be what Intel needs to make strides in this industry. The deal was announced on February 2 and is expected to be finalized in the next three months.

"The Lantiq purchase," says Jason Hope, "shows how many tech firms, like Intel, are looking to get into the connected 'smart home' market. It's not surprising, with the potential income available in this market."

In a press release announcing the acquisition, Kirk Skaugen, senior vice president and general manager of Intel's Client Computing Group, indicated that the change makes sense. Intel has pushed broadband into the home to help more people connect to the Internet via their computers, and now the addition of Lantiq technology will allow Intel to expand that influence to the modern connected home.

"By 2018," Skaugen said in the release, "we expect more than 800 million broadband connected households worldwide." That is a huge market that Intel is positioning itself to continue to reach.

According to the CNET.com piece, Samsung Electronics made a similar move by purchasing SmartThings last year, while Google's purchase of Nest, a smart thermostat maker, is another example of this switch. Intel's move is a change from recent advances it was attempting in the wearable technology market. Before the purchase of Latiq, Intel had partnered with watchmaker Fossil and glasses-frame maker Luxottica to create connected wearable devices.

"Whether through wearable’s or through the connected home," comments Hope, "Intel is showing that it is taking the Internet of Things seriously."

About Jason Hope

Jason Hope is based out of Arizona, where he works as a tech futurist and entrepreneur. His philanthropist efforts are focused on helping improve health in the future, easing the aging process and making life easier for people of all ages. Visit http://www.jasonhope.com to learn more about his latest projects.

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