Jason Hope, PC World Comment on Pixie Device to Find Lost IoT Devices

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Pixie joins the Internet of Things market place with the promise that it will help people find lost items quickly. While not a necessity, Jason Hope and PC World agree that this device can benefit those who are perpetually losing their belongings.

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While this device doesn't solve any health problems or contribute to a greater understanding of science, for those who have a constant problem with lost keys or a lost phone, the Pixie does help

For consumers who are constantly losing their phones, fitness trackers and other Internet of Things devices, the Pixie, a device that helps locate those items, may be the answer. PC World recently reported on the Pixie, which they called the "Location of Things," and Jason Hope feels this device could help solve one of the less serious problems with the growing Internet of Things.

In the February 3 article entitled "Pixie is a 'Location of Things' key-fob doohickey that helps you find all your things," Jon Philips of PC World discusses the benefits of this new device. The Pixie uses small Pixie Points that attach to the connected devices and allow the user to create a little network in which it is easier to find lost items. The Pixie Points can be attached to anything, including connected devices and non-connected devices, like car keys, as well. When something is missing, an app for Android or iOS shows the location within a 1 foot radius.

Pixie also allows the user to create kits. For instance, if someone wants to be certain that his wallet, keys and work binder are all in the briefcase, placing a Pixie Point on each one will allow him to check the kit before rushing out the door. The Pixie Points will be able to detect that they are close to one another, making the "kit" complete.

"The Pixie lets those who are constantly losing items save time and frustration," says Jason Hope. "While this device doesn't solve any health problems or contribute to a greater understanding of science, for those who have a constant problem with lost keys or a lost phone, the Pixie does help."

Users can also set up Pixie to protect their most important items, sending an alert when they walk too far from those items. For example, a favorite jacket could be marked to stay within a 20-foot zone of the individual. Should the individual leave it at work, the Pixie would alert him to that fact.

The market has other "find things" devices, but Pixie is the more affordable, and more accurate, option.

About Jason Hope

Jason Hope works as an entrepreneur and philanthropist. He is a native of Arizona, and currently works to support research into anti-aging technology and the benefits and developments of the Internet of Things. Learn more about his work at http://www.jasonhope.com.

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