New Cardiac Management Recommendations for Marfan Syndrome Now Available for Doctors and Patients

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Changes were made to reflect recent advances in the field

The Marfan Foundation continues to prioritize research into new medical therapies that can help people in our community have a better quality of life and live longer.

The Marfan Foundation has just published new cardiac management recommendations for the heart and blood vessels in Marfan syndrome. Changes were made in light of advances in the field, including the results of the losartan vs. atenolol clinical trial published last Fall.

The recommendations were developed by our Professional Advisory Board of medical experts on Marfan syndrome. They advise that people with Marfan syndrome – even the youngest children -- begin taking medication to slow the growth of their aorta as soon they are diagnosed with Marfan syndrome. Medication is recommended whether or not the aorta is enlarged.

Another change is that a higher dose of atenolol (a beta blocker medicine) is recommended. People who cannot take beta blockers can instead take losartan, which the research showed to have the same effect on the aorta as the higher dose of atenolol.

The mainstays of managing the heart and blood vessels in Marfan syndrome remain the same: early diagnosis, ongoing monitoring of the aorta and aortic root, and surgery to replace the aortic root or other enlarged parts of the aorta before a tear occurs.

”The Marfan Foundation continues to prioritize research into new medical therapies that can help people in our community have a better quality of life and live longer,” said Jo Grima, PhD, senior vice president of research and legislative affairs. “We are gratified to see that research is directly benefitting adults and children today.”

The new cardiac management recommendations can be downloaded for free. There is a version for patients and for doctors.

Marfan Syndrome and The Marfan Foundation

Marfan syndrome is a life-threatening genetic disorder of the body's connective tissue. It affects the heart and blood vessels, the bones and the eyes. Knowing the signs is the key to early and accurate diagnosis and life-saving treatment.

The Marfan Foundation creates a brighter future for everyone affected by Marfan syndrome and related disorders. It works tirelessly to advance research, serve as a resource for families and healthcare providers, and raise public awareness.

Learn more and get involved at http://www.marfan.org

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Eileen Masciale
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