Synaptic Super Bowl: A Touching Serotonin (5HT) Update ~ New on the Bryan William Brickner Blog

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Good hands (touch) are shaped by one’s serotonin system and will likely influence (no doubt) this year’s Super Bowl. In four short science tales based on new research from the National Institutes of Health (PubMed), one reads of serotonin (5-HT, 5-hydroxytryptamine) research on brains, guts, attention and massage therapy.

Dopamine and Serotonin Brain Pathways

There’s also one from the archives (2005) showing the effects of touch and the title sums up its positive role: Cortisol decreases and serotonin and dopamine increase following massage therapy.

“Touch – good hands – is a Super Bowl fundamental,” opened Bryan W. Brickner, “as any big play (made or broken) is sparked by a finger’s serotonergic give-and-take.”

In Synaptic Super Bowl: A Touching Serotonin (5HT) Update, new on the Bryan William Brickner Blog, the focus is the human body’s serotonergic and dopaminergic activity. The Super Bowl line-up includes three 2015 National Institutes of Health (PubMed) articles and one from the archives (2005). The serotonin touch-tales include: brain trauma (blast) and the serotonin N-acetyltransferase gene (Aanat), food metabolism (tryptophan) and the kynurenine pathway, ADHD changes with age, and, the one from the archives, touch/massage therapy decreases cortisol and increases dopamine and serotonin.

“Fans and athletes alike produce serotonin for game day,” noted Brickner, “with 80 to 90% made by our stomach’s enterochromaffin cells – the rest made in our brains – and then transported and distributed throughout our bodies.”

“Today’s science on attention and serotonin,” continued Brickner, “looks at how ADHD changes throughout life based on age. This occurs via dopamine and serotonin genetics; specifically, our 5-HTT (SERT) gene.”

“SERT is serotonin trucking, referred to as transporter,” Brickner explained, “as it carries serotonin across the blood-brain barrier to dopamine, which has no trucking. If there’s not enough SERT (serotonin trucking), and this varies with age, then dopamine will be at a disadvantage.”

“There’s also one from the archives (2005) showing the effects of touch,” closed Brickner, “and the title sums up its positive role: Cortisol decreases and serotonin and dopamine increase following massage therapy.”

Brickner has a 1997 political science doctorate from Purdue University and is the author of several political theory books, to include: The Promise Keepers: Politics and Promises (1999), Article the first of the Bill of Rights (2006), and Shivitti: A Review of Ka-Tzetnik 135633’s Vision (2015). He also writes political fiction, such as the novella thereafter (2013), and is the publisher of The Cannabis Papers: A citizen’s guide to cannabinoids (2011) and The Bryan William Brickner Blog, a resource for the political science of constitutions and the biological science of receptors.

Next Ew Publishing Homeostasis: tomorrow, 31 January, with Publius’ Super Bowl of Cannabinoid Science.

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Bryan W. Brickner
Ew Publishing
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