iYogi Fraud Alert: 4 Signs to Spot Publishers Clearing House Frauds

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Better Business Bureau (BBB) is spreading warnings of Publishers Clearing House fraud across the USA. BBB warned that Publishers Clearing House scam artists make hoax calls or send spam email messages wherein they impersonate as either the official Publisher’s Clearing House or the United States Post Office

Better Business Bureau (BBB) is spreading warnings of Publishers Clearing House fraud across the USA. BBB warned that Publishers Clearing House scam artists make hoax calls or send spam email messages wherein they impersonate as either the official Publisher’s Clearing House or the United States Post Office. iYogi Fraud Alert cautions people on how to identify various Publishers Clearing House fraud attempts and protect against these scam attacks.

What is Publishers Clearing House fraud?

Calls supposedly from Publishers Clearing House usually originate from an area code number 876, which is the area code of Jamaica. They make repetitive attempts to call and follow up with individuals asking them to pay 1% of the large amount of money they offer which could be worth millions. Many individuals have reported that they even received a letter with a check from Publishers Clearing House to meet up some specific types of expenses.

In addition to letters, many complained in iYogi Fraud Alert section that they are getting email containing stamps of Publishers Clearing House. They wanted to know if those mails from Publishers Clearing House and the prize money are for real or fraud attempts. iYogi cautions that scammers devise different types of prize money offers and other cash privileges. That’s why, some Publishers Clearing House fraud mails offer attractive sweepstakes while some mails offer coverage of some expenses or a large amount of prize money. What makes the matter even worse is that you may also receive legitimate mail from Publishers Clearing House which may entitle you to some sweepstakes – so, how to spot Publishers Clearing House frauds?

How to spot Publishers Clearing House frauds?

Here we brought these tips and tricks to spot Publishers Clearing House frauds. Ask yourself these questions when you encounter such calls, letters or emails.

Sign #1. When you receive a hoax call allegedly from Publishers Clearing House, you check out the area code. Chances are that the area code will be of Jamaica. Call back the person and ask about the area he is calling from. iYogi suggests that if the call originated from Jamaica and the caller says he or she is from other city or area, this will be a Publishers Clearing House fraud call.

Sign #2. Scammers of Publishers Clearing House fraud will try to collect personal information such as residential address, office addresses, employment details etc. They ask for such information to charge them with processing fees of the prize money they offer. iYogi recommends you to just hang up the phone and check with the local Publishers Clearing House if they are making such offers and what are their procedures of contest.

Sign #3. iYogi Fraud Alert strictly alert people not to provide any bank account details or send any money before you verify that the call is coming from a legitimate or trusted source. Are you being asked to reveal your Facebook details or birth date details? Publishers Clearing House frauds look for your birth date details and other details on your Facebook profile to steal your online identity.

Sign #4. When you receive a mail apparently from Publishers Clearing House, check out the email address. If the sender is using any personal email client, not the official email address of the Publishers Clearing House, then this is a sheer instance of Publishers Clearing House fraud.

Last but not least…

In addition to the email address in a Publishers Clearing House fraud email, you should also see if any phone number is given by the sender and also take a look at the name of the sender. A legitimate email from Publishers Clearing House will contain phone numbers to help people access the institution and offer details on the contest or sweepstakes. iYogi Fraud Alerts also advises that genuine Publishers Clearing House staff will not demand credit card details – hence, ignore these calls and emails and resist your temptations of prize money. Moreover, you can call Publishers Clearing House at their toll-free number to inquire and verify if you have won anything! So, treat carefully.

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Shreya Sabharwal
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