Make Id Happen: International Women’s Day and Hannah Arendt Footnotes #2 ~ New on the Bryan William Brickner Blog

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International Women’s Day and the political theories of Hannah Arendt are honored today in a post on utilitarianism, the famed theory of philosopher Jeremy Bentham. Author Bryan W. Brickner highlights Arendt’s 1958 book The Human Condition for its (basic) 21st century political applicability.

Hannah Arendt

Arendt questions the making human (homo faber) as our future and suggests we take a more basic look at ourselves through the lens of – animal rationale.

“Id is Latin for ‘it,’” opened Bryan W. Brickner, “so Make It Happen, the theme for this year’s International Women’s Day, can also mean Make Id Happen, a focus on making things like water, food and shelter (animal basics) international priorities – for all of us.”

In Make Id Happen: International Women’s Day and Hannah Arendt Footnotes #2, new on the Bryan William Brickner Blog, utilitarianism, the famed theory of Jeremy Bentham, is noted for its vacuous political theory. In the second part of the series on The Human Condition (1958), Brickner highlights Arendt’s book for its 21st century political applicability.

“In today’s post, Arendt is only footnoting,” Brickner offered, “speaking casually in a passing way, about the utter vacuum within Bentham’s utilitarianism – where nothing is ever useful.”

“Arendt notes,” Brickner followed, “that when Bentham derived his happiness principle from the utility principle, he divorced it from usage; she shows he had to in order to preserve a morality – a right and wrong.”

“This divorce exposes a making culprit (the ego),” Brickner continued, “and this too is Arendt – as The Human Condition is a review of the politics of making and ends up asking: Is all of our making the problem?”

“Arendt builds on the distinction between homo faber and animal rationale,” closed Brickner, “as she questions the making human (homo faber) as our future and suggests we take a more basic look at ourselves through the lens of – animal rationale.”

Brickner has a 1997 political science doctorate from Purdue University and is the author of several political theory books, including: The Promise Keepers: Politics and Promises (1999), Article the first of the Bill of Rights (2006), and Shivitti: A Review of Ka-Tzetnik 135633’s Vision (2015). He also writes political fiction, such as the novella thereafter (2013), and is the publisher of The Cannabis Papers: A citizen’s guide to cannabinoids (2011) and The Bryan William Brickner Blog, a resource for the political science of constitutions and the biological science of receptors.

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