Dr. Richard Buckley Comments on Newly Named “Magic Bullet” to Combat Obesity, Heart Disease is Key in Cosmetic Medicine

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Physical activity is the closest thing to a “magic bullet” to combat the worldwide epidemic of obesity and heart disease, according to an editorial published in the current issue of the scientific journal Cardiology. While this news and confirmation of the power of regular physical activity might not seem like it’s related to cosmetic medicine, it most certainly is, according to MilfordMD Cosmetic Dermatology Surgery & Laser Center Medical Director and cosmetic surgeon Dr. Richard Buckley.

The weight gain that results from today’s predominately sedentary lifestyles does more than add unwanted pockets of fat and lead to bodies with no tone, it puts people at risk for heart disease, heart attacks, diabetes, osteoarthritis—even cancer.

Physical activity is the closest thing to a “magic bullet” to combat the worldwide epidemic of obesity and heart disease, according to an editorial published in the current issue of the scientific journal Cardiology. While this news and confirmation of the power of regular physical activity might not seem like it’s related to cosmetic medicine, it most certainly is, according to MilfordMD Cosmetic Dermatology Surgery & Laser Center Medical Director and cosmetic surgeon Dr. Richard Buckley.

“Cosmetic medicine is more than changing what people see in the mirror,” Dr. Buckley says. “The best patient outcomes in cosmetic surgery from a range of options, including fat-removal and body sculpting to breast augmentation, reduction and lift, happen when patients are healthy and take care of their bodies.”

The problem is that most people don’t get enough exercise. “We need only look inside our own borders to realize that a lot of people don’t engage in regular physical activity,” Dr. Buckley ways. “Only about 20 percent of Americans get the recommended amount of regular physical activity and about 64 percent of Americans don’t do any exercise, at all.”

The weight gain that results from today’s predominately sedentary lifestyles in middle age does more than add unwanted pockets of fat and lead to bodies with no tone, it puts people at risk for heart disease, heart attacks, diabetes, osteoarthritis—even cancer.

Dieting might help people to shed a few pounds, but it’s not enough to maintain heart health. The study’s co-author Dr. Steven Lewis, a professor of medicine at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Fla., says there are a lot of misperceptions about the role of regular physical activity, caloric intake and calories burned during exercise. “And, as a result, calorie restriction dieting has been recommended as more practical for weight control than regular physical activity, and this is a big problem,” Dr. Lewis says.

Americans tend to gain between one and three pounds a year, starting in their 30s. By the time they’re 55, many have packed on between 30 and 50 pounds. Typically, Americans experience this mid-life weight gain with an increase in adipose tissue mass and loss of lean body mass that accompanies an inactive lifestyle, according to the study’s authors.

“The trend is to have a sculpted body, not just a thin frame,” according to Dr. Buckley. “We help patients achieve that with various procedures, including laser liposuction and CoolSculpting. The patients who get the best body sculpting results also exercise. We work as a team to achieve the desired look.”

Exercise recommendations include cardiovascular and resistance training. A 20-minute daily brisk walk burns off about 700 calories a week and reduces heart disease risk by 30 to 40 percent, according to the study’s authors. Resistance training, including training with weights or bands, in middle age helps people avoid the muscle wasting that occurs with age, aids in maintaining bone health and increases lean body mass. “People who exercise might have far less fat that needs to be removed to achieve their ideal look. Then, the options for the less invasive procedures and even noninvasive approaches becomes a reality,” Dr. Buckley says.

The bottom line is that physical activity helps people feel better, look better and live longer. Lack of physical activity may account for 22 percent of heart disease, 22 percent of colon cancer, 18 percent of osteoporotic fractures, 12 percent of diabetes and hypertension and five percent of breast cancer, the study’s authors report. People who seek cosmetic surgery tend to be motivated, intelligent men and women, Dr. Buckley says.

“We are in an ideal position, as cosmetic surgeons, to spread the word about the importance of physical activity for healthy insides and beautiful (or handsome) outsides,” he says. “We have an opportunity with this editorial to send a powerful message to people about the benefits of exercise. As cosmetic surgeons, we know how important it is for our patients to exercise and eat right, not only because those who do achieve better outcomes, but also because fitter people, who don’t smoke, have fewer complications and heal much faster.”

About MilfordMD Cosmetic Dermatology Surgery & Laser Center:

The MilfordMD Cosmetic Dermatology Surgery & Laser Center offers state-of-the-art highly specialized procedures in laser and cosmetic surgery and aesthetic skin care. In addition to its extensive laser surgery capabilities, MilfordMD offers physician designed skin care products for home use. Milford Pennsylvania’s MilfordMD Cosmetic Dermatology Surgery & Laser Center is sought out by patients from around the world for expertise and innovation in cosmetic treatments performed by Richard E. Buckley, M.D. and Marina Buckley, M.D.

MilfordMD Cosmetic Dermatology Surgery & Laser Center is located at 303 W. Harford Street, Milford, PA 18337. Tel: (800) 664-1528. For real patient video testimonials, visit our MilfordMD YouTube channel.

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Richard E. Buckley
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