Alimony, Divorce, and the "Second Wives Club" on The American Law Journal television program, CNN-News Affiliate WFMZ-TV: Video Online Now

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"The 'Second Wives Club' and The End of Alimony as We Know It" Many states are moving to end alimony. The surprise: It's not just men who want to reduce or end it.

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Courts are inconsistent. When we argue that alimony should stop because the recipient shouldn't be in a better position being divorced than had the couple been living together, I find that judges are all over the lot on that.

Alimony reform hasn’t yet taken the nation by storm, but here it comes, say guests on The American Law Journal on the Philadelphia CNN news affiliate WFMZ-TV. And it’s not just men demanding it. The so-named "Second Wives Club" is lobbying for changes so their own income doesn't go to the previous wife according to guests on the televised program.

“I was paying $865 a week in alimony and my business bottomed out,” says Massachusetts alimony reform advocate Steve Hitner on the program The 'Second Wives Club' and The End of Alimony as We Know It. “The court refused to modify. I realized the problem wasn’t the judge or the lawyers, it was the law. So I set out to change it. What surprised me were how many second wives, who saw their money going out to support their husband’s exes, joined the movement."

Hitner, with the organization Massachusetts Alimony Reform, successfully lobbied his state's legislature for reform resulting in An Act Reforming Alimony in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Family law attorney Bonnie C. Frost, Esq. of the New Jersey law firm Einhorn Harris concurs on the program. "If I have an older couple over sixty," says Frost "and they have less earning years in front of them, one discussion we have to have is 'when is this going to end?' Because clearly everyone has a contemplation that they are not going to work forever."

Although Massachusetts, New Jersey and others have passed alimony reform, spousal support has evolved and legislatures and courts are taking note, according to family law attorney Donald F. Spry, II of Pennsylvania's King Spry on the television program.

"Courts are inconsistent. When we argue that alimony should stop because the recipient shouldn't be in a better position being divorced than had the couple been living together, I find that judges are all over the lot on that.” Spry continues “Pennsylvania is not currently considering changes to alimony, but it won’t surprise me when it does.”

About The American Law Journal

The American Law Journal, recently honored with an Emmy, is the weekly talk-feature program airing Monday evenings on the CNN-News affiliate for Philadelphia WFMZ-TV 69. All programs are available at http://www.LawJournalTV.com.

The program won an Emmy for the program "Sexual Orientation, LGBT & the Workplace: ENDA of Discrimination?" in the Interview/Discussion category of the 2015 Emmy Awards in the Mid Atlantic chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. The program was also nominated in three other categories.

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