Renew Year's Resolutions: Tips to Quit Smoking - Quitter’s Circle Offers Another Chance to Quit Smoking in 2016

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For those whose smoke-free start to the New Year did not work out as planned, Quitter’s Circle is designed to help overcome common obstacles associated with quitting so they can continue their journey to be smoke-free in 2016.

Quitter’s Circle is designed to help smokers overcome common obstacles associated with quitting so they can continue their journey to be smoke-free.

Quitting smoking is very difficult, so if you slipped-up on your New Year’s resolution, know that you can try again. - Dr. Albert Rizzo, Senior Medical Advisor, American Lung Association

More than 160 million Americans make New Year’s resolutions, and each year quitting smoking is one of the most common. For the first week, 75 percent of people will stick to their resolutions, but the success rate gradually falls as we move away from January 1. For those whose smoke-free start to the New Year did not work out as planned, Quitter’s Circle (http://www.quitterscircle.com), a mobile app and online community, can help smokers choose a new quit date, personalize a plan to quit and involve a healthcare provider so by the next attempt, they reach their goal.

“Quitting smoking is very difficult, so if you slipped-up on your New Year’s resolution, know that you can try again. On average, it takes a smoker 6 to 11 quit attempts before they are completely smoke-free,” said Dr. Albert Rizzo, Senior Medical Advisor of the American Lung Association. “Many smokers try to quit without a plan and are unsuccessful. A quit plan is often designed in consultation with a healthcare provider, and having the advice and support of a healthcare provider, which can include medication and counseling, can double the chances of successfully quitting smoking.”

Quitter’s Circle, an initiative from the American Lung Association and Pfizer, is designed to help smokers overcome common obstacles associated with quitting so they can continue their journey to be smoke-free in 2016. A cornerstone of Quitter’s Circle is an online community with more than 165,000 members and a mobile app designed to help smokers quit through educational, social and financial support. Within a few clicks, Quitter’s Circle users can plan how they will quit, receive support from friends and family, and access resources to help connect with a healthcare provider about quitting – including real-time, mobile access to a healthcare provider.

In a U.S. national survey, 80 percent of smokers who are trying to quit reported that support from others, including friends, family, significant others and even coworkers, is very important to successfully quitting smoking. Through Quitter’s Circle, supporters can be invited to join Quit Teams so they can track their loved one’s progress, offer inspiration and even receive alerts when the smoker in their lives may need some extra support.

Smokers might need help when it comes to the financial impact of quitting as 78 percent of smokers surveyed say quit smoking aids are too expensive. Through the Quitter’s Circle app, supporters can access resources to contribute to a Quit Fund to help crowdfund quit attempts, which may include visits with a healthcare provider, counseling and medications, to assist with the cost of quitting.

For those who want to quit smoking, download the Quitter’s Circle app available on Android and Apple smartphones and the Apple Watch. For information and tips to help on the journey to a smoke-free life, visit http://www.QuittersCircle.com or join the Quitter’s Circle community at http://www.Facebook.com/QuittersCircle and @QuittersCircle on Twitter.

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About the American Lung Association
The American Lung Association is the leading organization working to save lives by improving lung health and preventing lung disease, through research, education and advocacy. The work of the American Lung Association is focused on four strategic imperatives: to defeat lung cancer; to improve the air we breathe; to reduce the burden of lung disease on individuals and their families; and to eliminate tobacco use and tobacco-related diseases. For more information about the American Lung Association, a holder of the Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Guide Seal, or to support the work it does, call 1-800-LUNGUSA (1-800-586-4872) or visit the newly redesigned website: Lung.org.

American Lung Association • 55 W. Wacker Drive • Chicago, IL 60601
1-800-LUNGUSA (1-800-586-4872) Lung.org

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Allison MacMunn

Allison MacMunn
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