Exhibit of Contemporary Artists Working in Miniature Opens at Museum of Miniatures January 2016

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A multi-media exhibit from New York featuring international contemporary artists working in miniature comes to The Mini Time Machine Museum of Miniatures in Tucson, Arizona on January 23, 2016.

In a world that grows ever more faster and chaotic, in a world in which we are bombarded with imagery, artworks in small scales allow us a place of retreat, where time has stopped.

Feel Big Live Small, a multi-media exhibit originally organized by Elan Smithee of apexart in NYC, will open at The Mini Time Machine Museum of Miniatures on Saturday, January 23, 2016 and run through April 17, 2016.

The exhibit includes 21 mixed media works of art created by 11 artists across the globe who have chosen miniatures as their medium to explore conceptual and theoretical views of modern life.

Exhibiting artist Thomas Doyle states; “In my experience, working at a small scale invites viewers into a personal, intimate relationship with the piece. At the same time, the very nature of small scales keeps us at a distance, unable to fully “enter” the work. I am interested in mystery, and absurdity, and wonder, and I often juxtapose opposing elements and scenarios to warp and upend reality. Working in a small scale gives me the opportunity to create something that is both “real” and “unreal” at the same time. Conversely, the creation of small worlds gives us the illusion of control. In a world that grows ever more faster and chaotic, in a world in which we are bombarded with imagery, artworks in small scales allow us a place of retreat, where time has stopped.”

The exhibit Feel Big Live Small is included with museum admission and includes a gallery guide and interactive activity. More information can be found at http://www.theminitimemachine.org/portfolio/feel-big-live-small/. Exhibit photos available upon request.

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Gentry Spronken
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