New York Jets wide receiver Brandon Marshall and Michi Marshall to receive award at the Linehan Institute Benefit.

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The Linehan Institute is pleased to announce that Project 375 co-founders Brandon and Michi Marshall will be honored at the Linehan Institute Benefit at the Dream Downtown Hotel in New York City on April 4th, 2016.

The Marshalls co-founded Project 375 to educate and advocate for changing the way mental health is regarded and discussed.

The Linehan Institute is pleased to announce that Project 375 co-founders Brandon and Michi Marshall will be honored at the Linehan Institute Benefit at the Dream Downtown Hotel in New York City on April 4th, 2016.

Brandon Marshall is a wide receiver for the New York Jets. He is a five-time Pro Bowler who has played for the Denver Broncos, the Miami Dolphins, and the Chicago Bears. Earlier in his career in the National Football League (NFL), Marshall experienced emotional instability which negatively affected his personal life, relationships, and career, resulting in his 2011 diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD). With the support of the NFL and his family, Marshall received treatment at McLean Hospital in Belmont, MA. Marshall has openly discussed his mental illness, as well as the treatment he received, with the hope that increased awareness and acceptance of mental disorders will help to educate and inform people about getting the help they need.

Brandon’s wife, Michi Marshall, is also passionate about affecting positive change in mental health. She is certified in Behavioral Forensics and Behavioral Profiling and holds degrees in psychology and criminal justice from the University of Central Florida. Her work as a Mental Health Technician, Behavioral Forensics Specialist, and Assessment Specialist has given her a well-informed framework with which to assess the public perception of mental health.

The Marshalls co-founded Project 375 to educate and advocate for changing the way mental health is regarded and discussed. Project 375 is dedicated to eradicating stigmas surrounding mental illness and disorders by encouraging others to speak out about the mental and emotional difficulties associated with mental illness. Its Project Prevent program also seeks to provide early intervention services to young adults suffering from mental health problems.

For their dedication to changing the conversation about mental illness, The Linehan Institute is proud to name Brandon and Michi Marshall the “10,000 Gold Stars” Honorees of the Linehan Institute Benefit.

The Linehan Institute was founded by Marsha Linehan, PhD, ABPP, the treatment developer of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), which is recognized as the gold standard treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD). She is a professor of psychology at the University of Washington, located in Seattle. Dr. Linehan’s life-changing psychotherapy teaches people effective skills to manage their emotions. Through her lifetime of work and research, Dr. Linehan has provided hope to those suffering from complex and severe mental disorders. Her ongoing research at the Behavioral Research and Therapy Clinics at the University of Washington continues to advance the effectiveness of mental health therapies to help individuals build lives worth living.

The Linehan Institute Benefit is an annual event to raise awareness and donations to expand DBT education and training, provide compassionate resources to those who suffer, and support new research. It will be held on April 4th, 2016 at the Dream Downtown, 355 West 16th Street, in New York.

Join us for inspiration and fun, surrounded by those dedicated to impacting lives, as we honor Brandon and Michi Marshall. Together we make this life-changing and effective treatment accessible and help those suffering find renewed lives. To RSVP for the event or donate, please visit http://www.linehaninstitute.org/events.

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Emma Croston
@LinehanInst
since: 10/2014
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