Workshop at 2016 iaedp Symposium Reveals Key Tasks in Eating Disorder Recovery to Re-establish Purpose

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At the 2016 iaedp Symposium, the workshop, “Tasks of the Recovery Phase: Re-Establishing Healthy Identity and Purpose,” will explore the critical tasks of the recovery phase and beyond including relapse prevention and healthy identity re-establishment. Shame resilience research along with key positive psychology findings will be applied and practical experiential interventions will be shared to aid the clinician.

Research has shown that building shame resilience in the recovery phases of eating disorder treatment helps to reduce the frequency and level of relapse.

At the 2016 iaedp Symposium, the workshop, “Tasks of the Recovery Phase: Re-Establishing Healthy Identity and Purpose,” will explore the critical tasks of the recovery phase and beyond including relapse prevention and healthy identity re-establishment. Shame resilience research along with key positive psychology findings will be applied and practical experiential interventions will be shared to aid the clinician.

The 2016 iaedp Symposium, scheduled for February 17-21, will be held at the Omni on Amelia Island in Florida. Registration information can be found at http://www.iaedp.com.

The recovery and beyond recovery phases of treatment involve critical tasks to sustain and support recovery. During the workshop, presenter Margaret Nagib, PsyD, will review two of these key tasks: relapse prevention and healthy identity re-establishment.

Dr. Nagib is a clinical psychologist specializing in spirituality, treating eating disorders, trauma, addiction, self-injury and mood disorders for over 15 years. Dr. Nagib currently travels throughout the U.S. to give clinical presentations to professionals on behalf of treatment center, Timberline Knolls, as part of its Clinical Development Institute.

Key findings in this research will be discussed and applied to eating disorder recovery phases. Participants will learn how to assess and build shame resilience to support relapse prevention. It will be shown that recovery is not fully realized without re-establishing a healthy and true identity apart from the eating disorder. Positive psychology research in the area of hope has been shown to be a vital construct in building identity, meaning, purpose and efficacy. Participants will learn how to asses and apply findings with practical assessment tools and interventions.

About iaedp: Since 1985, the International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals has provided education and training standards to an international and multidisciplinary group of various healthcare treatment providers and helping professions.

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Susan Lomelino
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