Tickle Your Valentine’s Toes with a Healthy Foot Massage

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The American Board of Multiple Specialties in Podiatry (ABMSP) has taken the upcoming Valentine’s Day as an opportunity to remind people of the great boosts—to body and soul—that come with a simple foot massage.

The American Board of Multiple Specialties in Podiatry (ABMSP)

The American Board of Multiple Specialties in Podiatry (ABMSP)

“I’ve never known anyone who didn’t like a good foot massage and there’s definitely a reason behind such universal appeal,” said Kenneth G. Rehm, D.P.M., Diplomate of the American Board of Multiple Specialties in Podiatry.

Looking for a last-minute Valentine’s Day gift for the special someone in your life? The answer may be at the tips of your toes. Foot massage, whether administered by a professional masseuse or a loved one, can bring substantial health benefits as well as pure comfort and relaxation. The American Board of Multiple Specialties in Podiatry (ABMSP) has taken the upcoming Valentine’s Day as an opportunity to remind people of the great boosts—to body and soul—that come with a simple foot massage.

“I’ve never known anyone who didn’t like a good foot massage and there’s definitely a reason behind such universal appeal,” said Kenneth G. Rehm, D.P.M., Diplomate of the American Board of Multiple Specialties in Podiatry. “The simple truth is that the foot is attached to the rest of the body, and more than just by way of the leg. The ancient Chinese believed the foot had energy lines that affected all the other organs and all parts of the body.” Acupuncturists and massage therapists, Rehm said, work to stimulate these channels to produce desired results. A lay person with a gentle touch can also work wonders through simple massage techniques. The benefits of repeated—or even one-time—foot massage include:

  • Improved circulation. This is especially important for people suffering from diabetes, which is a known culprit of chronic poor circulation. Foot massage stimulates better blood flow, thus reducing blood pressure and improving overall body function.
  • Stress reduction. Gentle massage soothes muscles and in turn calms the nervous system, resulting in a more relaxed state of mind and a more attuned and satisfied consciousness. Put simply, foot massage stimulates a simple “live in the moment” reflex that’s hard to beat.
  • Eased pain and soreness. Nothing eases stiffness, soreness, and just plain fatigue like soothing touch. Foot massage can reduce the discomforts of a day’s work and can even accelerate recovery from foot injuries and ailments.
  • Improved skin integrity. Particularly in patients with diabetes, the skin on the feet and ankles can be at risk for lesions that may deteriorate into limb-threatening wounds. Careful, gentle foot massage can improve skin elasticity and strength and help maintain its protective properties.

“A foot massage can not only be a healing experience, but an amorous one as well,” Rehm said. “I think a good foot massage would be a great treat for the feet for that special person.”

About ABMSP
The American Board of Multiple Specialties in Podiatry was originally organized by podiatrists for the purpose of granting board certification to office-based and ambulatory foot surgeons. Incorporated in 1986 as the American Institute of Foot Medicine (AIFM), the name was changed in 1992 to better reflect its mission. The Board now offers certification to qualified podiatrists in all areas of podiatric practice: Primary Care in Podiatric Medicine; Foot and Ankle Surgery, both in a hospital setting and in outpatient facilities; Prevention and Treatment of Diabetic Foot Wounds and Foot Wear; and Limb Preservation and Salvage. The California Board of Medicine, through the California Board of Podiatric Medicine, has authorized diplomates of the American Board of Multiple Specialties in Podiatry to advertise their certification from the Board in the State of California. Also, the Board’s certification examinations have been approved for reimbursement by the VA as an educational benefit for eligible veterans. The American Board of Multiple Specialties in Podiatry is the only podiatric certification program accredited by URAC (formerly the Utilization Review Accreditation Commission) and by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) under the ISO International Standards ANSI/ISO/IEC/17024:2003 for Accreditation for Bodies Operating Certification of Persons. For more information, visit http://www.abmsp.org.

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Bonnie Hayflick

Jenna Webb
The American Board of Multiple Specialties in Podiatry
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