Proceedings of the IEEE Special Issue Electronic Ship Technologies

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Proceedings of the IEEE has released a special issue on Electric Ship Technologies that provides a comprehensive overview of the history of electric ship propulsion, the present status of both commercial and military electric ships, and the ongoing research that will lead to the fully integrated all-electric ship.The issue contains 13 Invited papers from world leading experts.

Special issue on Electric Ship Technologies.

Proceedings of the IEEE special issue drives home the topic of electric ship technologies

This special issue is designed to give readers a deeper look at the various ships in which electric propulsion and electric power distribution are making significant advances in everything from design to operation of the ship systems.

Proceedings of the IEEE, the most highly cited general interest journal in electrical engineering and computer science, has released a special issue on Electric Ship Technologies.

Under the guidance of guest editors Steinar J. Dale, former director for the Center for Advanced Power Systems at Florida State University, Robert E. Hebner, Director of the Center for Electromechanics at the University of Texas, and Giorgio Sulligoi, Assistant Professor of Dynamic Modeling of Electric Generator at the University of Trieste in Italy, this special issue presents recent advances as well as latest research trends and findings on the emerging topic of electric ship propulsion, including environmental requirements and cost of operations.

“This special issue provides a comprehensive overview of the history of electric ship propulsion, the present status of both commercial and military electric ships, and the ongoing research that will lead to the fully integrated all-electric ship,” says Dr. Dale, who is also an IEEE Life Fellow. “The 13 invited papers are designed to give readers a deeper look at the various ships in which electric propulsion and electric power distribution are making significant advances in everything from design to operation of the ship systems and the challenges they must overcome.”

Papers from the Proceedings of the IEEE special issue cover:

  • The history of electric ship propulsion development and application in commercial ships, and the role of power electronic drives in optimizing the efficiency of an integrated power system.
  • The status of electric propulsion and the integrated power system (IPS) approaches and ship classes developed by the U.S. Navy, from the early 1900s through today.
  • The development and the present state of the art of hybrid propulsion drive systems as it applies to high performance naval combatants.
  • The advances made in power semiconductors through the introduction of wide-band gap semiconductors that has enabled and will continue to enable advances in motor drives and integrated power systems for an integrated and optimized ship power system.
  • Major classes of motors that are suitable for ship propulsion.
  • The approaches to power flow control and network stability of an integrated ship power system through the methods of ‘‘smarter’’ generators through its power electronic interface.
  • Three types of motors developed for icebreakers in order to illustrate the evolution of electric propulsion motors in Japan, and the present state of R&D of high temperature superconducting (HTS) motors.

With modern technology and the evolution of computing and telecommunications to control a ship’s power system, a large emphasis of the papers is on energy storage. In the paper, “Dynamic Load and Storage Integration,” by R. E. Hebner, K. Davey, J. Herbst, D. Hall, J. Hahne, D. D. Surls, and A. Ouroua, the authors describe the developments and application of energy storage in a ship system to facilitate ride-through capability for gas turbine generators, and to provide power grid stability during switching of large loads.

Shore power, which enables ships to turn off their diesel engines and connect to local electric power that travels to the ship from a specially designed transformer at the dock, has also made vast advancements. In the paper, “Shore-to-Ship Power” by G. Sulligoi, D. Bosich, R. Pelaschiar, G. Lipardi, and F. Tosato, the authors present the requirements and technologies for providing ship power from a shore connection when the ship is in port by highlighting ways to help reduce pollutants that effect the environment and marine life.

To learn about the special issue on electric ships, and more, visit the Proceedings of the IEEE website.

About the Proceedings of the IEEE
Founded in 1912 and first published in early 1913 (originally as Proceedings of the IRE), Proceedings of the IEEE is the most highly cited general-interest journal in electrical engineering and computer science. This journal provides the most in-depth tutorial and review coverage of the technical developments that shape our world, enlisting the help of guest editors and authors from the best research facilities, leading-edge corporations and universities around the world. For more information on Proceedings of the IEEE and the latest ideas and innovative technologies, visit http://www.ieee.org/proceedings, LinkedIn and Facebook.

About IEEE
IEEE, the world’s largest technical professional association, is dedicated to advancing technology for the benefit of humanity. Through its highly cited publications, conferences, technology standards, and professional and educational activities, IEEE is the trusted voice on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power, and consumer electronics. Learn more at http://www.ieee.org.

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Lauren Russ