LDM Global Hires Pamela Choate as new Project Manager

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Choate joins eDiscovery and computer forensics consultancy after 15 years in the business

LDM Global
One of the things that I love about working with clients is that we are able to help even the playing field for the small- to medium-size firms.

LDM Global is pleased to announce the hiring of Pamela Choate as a professional services project manager. LDM Global is a leading consultant to mid-tier law firms around the world, focusing on legal discovery management and computer forensics.

Choate began her legal technology career in 2000 in the IT department for a law firm in Denver. She has served as a help desk specialist, litigation support analyst, ESI consultant, litigation support specialist and project manager in medium-sized law firms in Denver and Dallas. With more than 15 years of experience in the legal industry, she is well versed in the EDRM model and standard litigation processes, with a focus on streamlining the review process for clients. Choate is a certified administrator in both Relativity and Viewpoint.

“One of the things that I love about working with clients is that we are able to help even the playing field for the small- to medium-size firms,” Choate said. “When technology is used efficiently in conjunction with creative consulting from the onset of a case, it allows small and medium firms the leverage to compete for cases with extensive discovery needs, which have typically favored larger firms.”

Being creative with solutions and emphasizing consultancy is a focus for LDM Global. This includes liaising with clients earlier in their cases, something that has proven popular in terms of case strategy and predictable budgeting.

“By getting our team involved earlier in a case, we can spend time reading the litigation documents such as the complaint and consider what types of electronically stored information will be most prevalent,” said Director of Professional Services Jennifer Holt. “That means we can advise during early planning meetings to help create the best strategy for the case. This generally saves money and helps to create a predictable budget because we aren’t forced to use an inefficient strategy by being brought to the table after the strategy has already been defined.”

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Allison Miriani
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