Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety to Interview Dr. Michael Jopling on Reducing Adverse Events and Death from Colonoscopies

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Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety is pleased to announce that it will be Interviewing Michael W. Jopling, MD on reducing adverse events and death from colonoscopies and other gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures

Michael W. Jopling, MD

Michael W. Jopling, MD

Compared to patients with SpO2 sensor used only, patients used capnography sensors (with and without SpO2 sensors) associated with 47% reduction in the odds of death ...

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Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety is pleased to announce that it will be Interviewing Michael W. Jopling, MD on reducing adverse events and death from colonoscopies and other gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures

Millions of colonoscopies and other gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures in the US each year. In 2009, more than 55 million gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures were performed.

Endoscopy is usually a safe procedure and the risk of serious complications is very low. In looking at colonoscopies, which constitute about half of gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures, overall serious adverse event rate was 2.8 per 1000 procedures and the death rate was just 0.03 percent, according to guidelines published by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

However, the risk of complication rises with the use of sedation. The goal of sedation when used in colonoscopies and other gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures is safely and effectively manage any pain, discomfort, or anxiety the patient may have during the procedure.

In research presented at this year’s annual conference of the Society for Technology in Anesthesia, Michael W. Jopling, MD (NorthStar Anesthesia, Springfield Regional Medical Center, Springfield, OH) will discuss his study, which won “Best of Show”, that investigated the incidence of rescue events and adverse outcomes during gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures performed with sedation administration.

Dr. Jopling found that:

"Compared to patients with SpO2 sensor used only, patients used capnography sensors (with and without SpO2 sensors) associated with 47% reduction in the odds of death and 10% reduction in the odds of naloxone and/or flumazenil administration for inpatient, and 82% reduction in the odds of death and 62% reduction in the odds of naloxone and/or flumazenil use for outpatients."

PPAHS will be interviewing Dr. Jopling as part of its clinical education series, which features doctors, nurses and respiratory therapists discussing how they have successfully implemented continuous patient monitoring in their hospitals.

Dr. Jopling is a member of PPAHS’s board of advisors.

About Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety

Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety is a non-profit 501(c)(3) whose mission is to promote safer clinical practices and standards for patients through collaboration among healthcare experts, professionals, scientific researchers, and others, in order to improve health care delivery. For more information, please go to http://www.ppahs.org

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