$100 Million Of Historic Numismatic National Treasure On Display In Dallas

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Complimentary appraisals of the public’s old coins and paper money, and see some of the world's most famous and valuable rare coins and currency, including a $200,000 penny and a famous $3 million nickel, on public display at the National Money Show in Dallas, Texas, March 3 – 5, 2016.

One of the world's most famous coins, a 1913 Liberty Head nickel insured for $3 million, is one of the attractions at the family-friendly National Money Show in Dallas, March 3 - 5, 2016.

The public will have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see more than $100 million of historic rare coins and currency, including a $200,000 penny and a famous, multi-million dollar nickel, as well as get complimentary appraisals of their old coins and paper money at the National Money Show (http://www.NationalMoneyShow.com). The family-friendly, educational event will be held in the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center at 650 Griffin Street in Dallas, March 3 – 5, 2016.

One of the featured exhibits is a 1913 Liberty Head nickel, one of only five known and valued at $3 million. The coin was extensively publicized by legendary Fort Worth coin dealer B. Max Mehl as an instant-riches advertising gimmick during the Great Depression. He offered to pay $50 each for them during the 1930s.

The National Money Show is sponsored by the nonprofit, Congressionally-chartered American Numismatic Association (ANA). During the three-day show more than 500 dealers from across the country will be buying and selling coins, paper money, tokens and medals with the public with items ranging from a dollar to over a million dollars each.

Admission will be free on Free Appraisal Day, Saturday, March 5, when the public can get complimentary, educational appraisals of their old coins and paper money from top numismatic experts.

"Money is history you can hold in your hands. Every coin and piece of paper money ever made has a story to tell about people, places or events," said ANA President Jeff Garrett.
“Visitors to the show will be able to see a $200,000 penny on display for the first time in Texas. It’s a Lincoln cent that was struck in the wrong metal in 1943 at the San Francisco Mint,” said ANA Money Museum Curator Douglas Mudd.

“During World War II, copper was needed for war-related materials and one-cent coins were supposed to be struck only in zinc-coated steel during 1943. This one was mistakenly made of bronze, the same metal used for the 1942-dated cents, and it recently sold at auction for $211,500,” explained Mudd.

Other eye-opening exhibits of numismatic national treasures include a fabled 1804-dated U.S. silver dollar, one of only seven known of its kind and insured for $4 million; rare, pristine condition U.S. gold coins from the estate of well-known Texas business executive and philanthropist Harry W. Bass Jr.; ancient Greek silver coins that commemorated Olympic games 2,000 years ago; and a display of historic paper money issued by Texas banks during the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Informative, introductory half-hour programs on how to begin collecting will be offered to the public at 10 am and 2 pm on both Thursday and Friday, March 3 and 4, and also at noon on Saturday, March 5. Dallas-based Heritage Auctions will conduct public auctions of vintage United States rare coins at the show and online (http://www.HA.com).

The National Money Show will be in Hall A of the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center, 650 Griffin Street, Dallas. Public hours are Thursday and Friday March 3 and 4, 2016 from 10 am to 5:30 pm, and Saturday, March 5, from 10 am to 4 pm.

General admission on Thursday and Friday, March 3 and 4 will be $8 for adults. Children 12 and under will be admitted free. A $2 discount coupon is available online at http://www.NationalMoneyShow.com, and there will be complimentary admission for all on Free Appraisal Day, Saturday, March 5.

For additional information, visit the American Numismatic Association National Money Show website, http://www.NationalMoneyShow.com, or call (719) 482-9867.

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