Sourcewater CEO Adler Leads WSJ ECO:nomics Roundtable on Water Wars in Energy and Agriculture

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Sourcewater founder and chief executive Joshua Adler will lead a roundtable discussion titled “Water Wars: Water Issues in Energy and Agriculture” at the Wall Street Journal ECO:nomics 2016 conference April 6-8 in Santa Barbara, California.

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“The most powerful way we can incentivize water conservation and investment in new water technologies and supplies is to treat water like every other valuable resource in our economy: let the market price it.” – Joshua Adler, Sourcewater Founding CEO

Sourcewater, the water exchange for the energy ecosystem, announces its founding chief executive Joshua Adler will be leading a roundtable discussion titled “Water Wars: Water Issues in Energy and Agriculture” at the the Wall Street Journal ECO:nomics 2016 April 6-8 in Santa Barbara, California. The roundtable lunch discussion will take place on Thursday, April 7 at 12:35 pm. Adler will join other energy and sustainability leaders speaking at the conference, such as U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, Ford Motor CEO Mark Fields, Pioneer Natural Resources CEO Scott Sheffield, Opower CEO Alex Laskey and Sunpower CEO Thomas Werner. To attend Adler’s roundtable discussion, visit http://www.economics.wsj.com.

Sourcewater is the first online marketplace for water sourcing, recycling, transport and disposal. The company’s focus on minimizing the cost of water management within the agriculture and energy industries places it at the heart of the national debate over energy policy, sustainability and climate, the focus of the Wall Street Journal’s ECO:nomics conference.

Many companies struggle to balance profitability and sustainability concerns around water. Sourcewater, by creating an efficient market for sourcing, transporting and recycling all forms of water – freshwater, non-freshwater and wastewater – improves profitability, resilience and sustainability in tandem for water intensive industries. These market-based efficiencies break the conventional trade-offs between profits and sustainability. Those who attend Adler's roundtable will benefit from his knowledge and unique insight into best practices for water management in the energy and agriculture industries.

Adler stated: “Water is the largest input for the oil and gas, power generation and agriculture industries. Water is also by far the largest output and operating cost of oil and gas production, which generates 10 times more water than oil every year. Water is also the primary waste product of animal and crop farming. Thus water is the greatest cost and risk for these industries, but it is also a tremendous opportunity for beneficial reuse and efficiency gains.”

About Sourcewater: Sourcewater, a spinout from MIT’s Energy Ventures program, is the water exchange for the energy ecosystem. It is the first online exchange for sourcing, transporting, recycling and disposing of water for oil and gas production, a $50 billion U.S. market. Our marketplace enables energy companies to minimize their single largest operating cost, water management, ensures a reliable mission-critical water supply chain, and reduces the environmental and community impacts of energy production. Sourcewater launched in 2015 and has already registered over 150 companies as users. Over 1 billion barrels of water are now available for purchase or recycling on Sourcewater.com.

About Joshua Adler: Joshua Adler is a successful entrepreneur, veteran dealmaker and world-class communicator who has founded energy, real estate, medical technology and Internet companies. He also served as chief speechwriter for two United States Treasury Secretaries. He is a graduate of Yale University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he was a Sloan Fellow for Innovation and Global Leadership in Energy Ventures. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and The Economist. In December 2015, Adler argued in The New York Times for the repeal of the U.S. energy export ban, writing: “For as long as the world uses hydrocarbons, it is plainly in the United States’ economic, geopolitical and environmental interest to produce that energy here, with American workers and oversight.”

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