Artist Devin Thor's Solo Show "Paleolithic Creates" - Featuring Sandstone Sculptures Inspired by Cave Paintings - Opens in Los Angeles on April 9

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“Paleolithic Creatures,” artist and geologist Devin Thor’s homage to prehistory, encourages responsible environmental stewardship with the message “Extinction is forever.” Thor’s solo show opens April 9 at Gallery 825 in L.A. with a reception from 6-9 PM.

"Paleolithic Creatures" - Sandstone sculptures by Devin Thor

“I am inspired to challenge the viewer to feel the natural spirit of inclusion. There is no corner of this planet to which man has not caused change. We must be good stewards of the Earth and remember that extinction is forever.”

Southern California-based artist Devin Thor’s solo exhibit “Paleolithic Creatures” carries with it the message that “extinction is forever.” The show opens on Saturday, April 9, at Gallery 825, the exhibition arm of Los Angeles Art Association (http://www.laaa.org/). Thor will present sculptures cut from Arizona sandstone depicting extinct species. He conceived the show as “an homage to our prehistoric ancestors and the animals they painted on cave walls. Those paintings provide powerful depictions of man’s inherent drive to express himself through art.” There will an artists’ reception at the gallery from 6-9PM (825 N. La Cienega Boulevard, West Hollywood, CA 90069).

Paleolithic Creatures comprises pieces representing bison, fawn antelopes, and a large antelope. Thor’s intent was to purposefully design each one to minimize the number of lines needed to define the animal so as to capture its spirit and essence. “I wanted to portray the true sense, the big picture, without having to intellectualize it too much,” he says.

Thor first learned and practiced art through the influence of his father, a Disney animator and fine art painter. He chose, though, to pursue science in college, and as a geologist spent his career researching and studying natural forces that have shaped and changed our planet.

With his return to art full time, Thor also intends for an ethical and environmental message to underlie his stone works of now ghostly life forms—remembered only by ancient renderings on cave walls—lost to extreme climate change millennia ago. In his statement for Paleolithic Creatures he says, “I am inspired…to challenge the viewer to feel the natural spirit of inclusion. There is no corner of this planet that man does not live in, and no corner of to which man has not caused change. We must be good stewards of the Earth and remember that extinction is forever.”

Thor uses sandstone, also called flagstone by landscapers, sourced from quarries in central Arizona. Color variations in the sculptures include red from oxidized iron, and black from oxidized manganese—both metals occur naturally in the stone. Green tones are from the growth of lichen, an organic composite life form (some of which are considered to be among the earth’s oldest living things).

The heavy work to create the pieces is done by hand. Thor uses hand-held circular saws with diamond blades (18” and 10”) to cut the stone. Other hand-held items in Thor’s toolkit include grinders with masonry grinding discs and sanding discs, a rotor tool with ceramic tile drilling bit, and an orbital sander. To view additional pieces: To view additional images of the work: https://www.dropbox.com/home/Paleolithic%20Creatures

To further his practice, Thor has attended annual Iron Pour and Bronze Pour Workshops in Tucumcari, New Mexico, conducted by internationally recognized sculptor and teacher D’Jean Jawrunner.

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Laura Grover
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