Easter Lilies can be Deadly to Cats — Tips to Keep Pets Safe at Easter from the Veterinary Specialists at MedVet Medical & Cancer Centers for Pets

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Many flowers and plants can be dangerous to pets, but all parts of all lily plants are extremely toxic to cats and can be fatal. Pet owners with any concern that their cat or dog has ingested lilies should seek immediate emergency veterinary care at their local veterinarian or at MedVet Medical & Cancer Centers for Pets .

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“Ingesting any part of a lily plant can cause serious illness or even lead to death. Because many lilies are so highly-poisonous to cats, prompt veterinary care is required.”

The veterinary specialists at MedVet Medical & Cancer Centers for Pets want cat owners to know about the danger of lilies. “Lilies are extremely poisonous to cats,” said Dr. Jerry Klein, supervising veterinarian at MedVet Chicago. “Ingesting any part of a lily plant can cause serious illness or even lead to death. Because many lilies are so highly-poisonous to cats, prompt veterinary care is required.”

Stargazer lilies, day lilies, Asiatic, Easter, and tiger lilies are among the more common lilies found in flower arrangements. Each lily can be deadly to a cat that chews the leaves or ingests any part of the flower, including the stem, leaves, petals or pollen. A cat can even be poisoned by drinking water that lilies were stored in. Cats that ingest any part of a lily may develop acute renal failure and die within days.

Treatment for ingesting lilies can be difficult for the cat and expensive for its owners. Although there is no antidote, prompt treatment with intravenous fluids and other medical support can help save your cat. Without treatment, the cat will suffer from renal failure and die.
Some types of lily can also present a danger to dogs, but less so than to cats. Pet owners with any concern that their cat or dog has ingested lilies should immediately contact:

Anyone who suspects that her or his cat has come in contact with any part of a lily plant should seek immediate veterinary care. Although there is no antidote, prompt treatment can help save the cat.

“We remind cat owners to keep lilies out of their homes,” said Dr. Klein. “And if there are outdoor cats in your neighborhood, please don’t plant lilies in your yard.”

About MedVet
MedVet Medical & Cancer Centers for Pets, with headquarters in Columbus, Ohio, is a widely recognized and growing group of emergency, critical care and specialty referral veterinary hospitals for companion animals. MedVet is employee owned, veterinary led, and is leading specialty healthcare for pets. MedVet provides specialty referral services for in-depth care and patient management, as well as emergency services, available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. More than 100,000 pets are treated annually at MedVet’s expanding network of medical centers across the country in Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Alabama, and Louisiana.

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Tami Adcock

Eva Kaltenbach
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