Conservation Organization Rare Offers Environmental Protection Tips for Earth Day and Beyond

Share Article

Act Local, Think Global: Three Ways to Ignite Positive Environmental Change

A local girl planting a tree at a Rare Pride mural painting event in Pance, Colombia.

"We believe that conservation’s greatest challenges are the result of human behaviors. And, so too are the solutions," said Brett Jenks, CEO of Rare.

In observance of Earth Day, the international conservation organization Rare is offering up three easy ways you can be a catalyst for global change.

The strain on the Earth’s natural resources poses an increasing threat to the well-being of both people and nature. Though people are often the source of these pressures, they also hold the solutions – and it all starts with behavior.

1.    Ensure your seafood is sourced sustainably.

42% of people worldwide rely on fish as an important source of protein.

Most of the world’s fisheries are unmanaged and overexploited, and are in serious decline. This puts our food supply in jeopardy and makes ecosystems less healthy and more vulnerable to climate and other changes. A compelling action a single consumer can take is purchasing local, sustainably caught seafood. Check packaging labels, diversify your selection, and seek out seafood guides that list which fish that are caught and sourced sustainably.

2.    Organize or join a community-led clean up near waterways to prevent contamination to rivers, lakes and other fresh water sources.

Freshwater ecosystems cover less than 1% of the Earth’s surface, but are home to 35% of all vertebrate species.

A healthy watershed, with its forests and unique biodiversity, provides water storage, regulates and filters fresh water and is critical to flood management to surrounding areas. By removing plastics bottles, bags, and other debris along the waterway, you ensure the watershed ecosystem remains healthy and productive.

3.    Join a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and get to know your local farmer, what they grow, and how they grow it.

Agriculture is one of the leading sources of water pollution worldwide.

Small-scale farmers often overuse fertilizer, pesticides and other harmful chemicals. This pollution leaches into streams and aquifers with dangerous effects, finding ways into wetland and river ecosystems. Community Supported Agriculture Networks are an easy and delicious way to engage in your community, and encourage others to adopt more sustainable behaviors. Ensuring that your food is grown locally and pesticide-free benefits the health of both people and nature alike.

“We believe that conservation’s greatest challenges are the result of human behaviors. And, so too are the solutions,” said Brett Jenks, CEO of Rare. “Rare’s signature Pride campaigns inspire pride around unique natural assets and create a clear path for local change. By empowering communities to seek their own solutions, the change tends to stick.”

Rare has been implementing proven conservation solutions and training local leaders in communities worldwide for more than 25 years. Rare’s hope is to inspire people to take pride in their community, not just on Earth Day but all year, and suggests these practical alternatives to environmentally destructive practices.

ABOUT RARE
Rare is an innovative conservation organization that implements proven conservation solutions and trains local leaders in communities worldwide. Through its signature Pride campaigns, Rare inspires people to take pride in the species and habitats that make their community unique, while also introducing practical alternatives to environmentally destructive practices. Employees of local governments or non-profit organizations receive extensive training on fisheries management, campaign planning and social marketing to communities. They are equipped to deliver community-based solutions based on natural and social science, while leveraging policy and market forces to accelerate change through programs such as Fish Forever. To learn more about Rare, please visit http://www.rare.org/.

For more information and downloadable imagery, please visit our electronic press kit at https://www.rare.org/en-press-kit.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Julie Langlie
Bullseye Communications
+1 (410) 353-4587
Email >

Heather Marohn
Visit website