Consumer Reports Wins Sigma Delta Chi Award from the Society of Professional Journalist For Excellence in Journalism

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Not-For-Profit’s Reporting Recognized for Investigative Series “America’s Antibiotic Crisis”

CR August 2015 Issue

The 2015 investigative series uncovers and explains how the overuse and misuse of antibiotics fueled the rise of “superbugs” and antibiotic-resistant infections, triggering the health crisis of this generation.

Consumer Reports has been honored with a Sigma Delta Chi award for excellence in journalism by the Society of Professional Journalists. The award will be presented at the annual Sigma Delta Chi Awards banquet on Friday, June 24 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.

Consumer Reports won the award in the Public Service Journalism category for “America’s Antibiotic Crisis.” The 2015 investigative series uncovers and explains how the overuse and misuse of antibiotics fueled the rise of “superbugs” and antibiotic-resistant infections, triggering the health crisis of this generation.

“We are very grateful for this honor,” said Marta L. Tellado, President and CEO of Consumer Reports. “We remain dedicated to hard-hitting investigative consumer journalism that fearlessly uncovers and rigorously reports on the issues facing consumers everyday so that they can make meaningful choices that positively impact their lives.”

More than 70 Consumer Reports staffers in four states collaborated on the project, which was curated with robust coverage on the organization’s website, and articles in four issues of Consumer Reports magazine, including a cover story about the beef industry.

About Consumer Reports
Consumer Reports is the world’s largest and most trusted nonprofit, consumer organization working to improve the lives of consumers by driving marketplace change. Founded in 1936 Consumer Reports has achieved substantial gains for consumers on health reform, food and product safety, financial reform, and other issues. The organization has advanced important policies to cut hospital-acquired infections, prohibit predatory lending practices and combat dangerous toxins in food. Consumer Reports tests and rates thousands of products and services in its 50 plus labs, state-of-the-art auto test center and consumer research center. Consumers Union, a division of Consumer Reports, works for pro-consumer laws and regulations in Washington, D.C., the states, and in the marketplace. With more than eight million subscribers to its flagship magazine, website and other publications, Consumer Reports accepts no advertising, payment or other support from the companies whose products it evaluates.

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C. Matt Fields
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