Food Allergy Research & Education Encourages Others to React with Respect During Food Allergy Action Month

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FARE encourages Americans to "React with Respect" during Food Allergy Action Month to reinforce the severity of food allergy and foster respect and empathy for the 15 millions of Americans who live with food allergies.

When someone has a food allergy, everyone needs to help keep them safe and respect that they are managing a life-altering and potentially life-threatening disease.

Every day, 15 million Americans with food allergies face difficult challenges in avoiding their food allergens and preventing life-threatening reactions, called anaphylaxis. This May, Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE), the nation’s leading advocacy organization dedicated to food allergy, is encouraging Americans to “React with Respect” during Food Allergy Action Month to reinforce the severity of food allergy and foster respect and empathy for those affected.

Food Allergy Action Month is an expansion of Food Allergy Awareness Week, which is being observed May 8-14 and was created by FARE in 1998. This week-long occasion was created as a way of bringing attention to food allergy, and is now the anchor of FARE’s month-long awareness activities. One of the goals of this initiative is to help inform the public about the serious consequences of food allergy reactions, as well as how to identify symptoms and respond in case of an emergency.

As FARE continues to advance research toward future treatments for food allergies, this awareness campaign is critical to supporting the ability of individuals with food allergies to live safe, productive lives with the respect of others. FARE encourages people to “react with respect” the next time they learn someone has food allergies by educating themselves about food allergies and anaphylaxis.

“FARE is leading efforts to fund research to improve the lives of the millions affected by food allergies. We work to support adults and families managing food allergies with educational resources to help them not just live well, but thrive,” said James R. Baker, Jr. M.D., CEO of FARE. “At the same time, it is critically important to bring understanding and education to the general public. When someone has a food allergy, everyone needs to help keep them safe and respect that they are managing a life-altering and potentially life-threatening disease.”

FARE has a number of initiatives planned for Food Allergy Action Month in which supporters can participate, and across the country, families, individuals, schools and corporations will be observing the month in a variety of ways. Highlights of FARE’s May programming include:

  • FARE has partnered with the Empire State Building to light the iconic building in teal, the color of food allergy awareness, on May 8, the first day of Food Awareness Week. Across the country, volunteers have worked with other landmarks such as the Terminal Tower in Cleveland, Niagara Falls and the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans to “Turn Teal.” Additionally, FARE will be promoting food allergy awareness via a high-profile billboard at One Times Square through the month of May.
  • A Wakeup Call,” FARE’s newest video, sends a powerful message about the importance of being prepared for anaphylaxis through the perspective of 19-year-old Heather Braverman, who shares her story about experiencing her first anaphylactic reaction in more than 16 years.
  • Advocacy Days, a series of meetings organized by FARE at state capitals in California, Illinois, New York and Ohio, that are designed to educate lawmakers about the importance of supporting legislation to improve the lives of those with food allergies, including ensuring access to epinephrine.
  • FARE’s Food Allergy Action Month calendar, which provides one action individuals can take each day to support the food allergy community.
  • The FARE National Food Allergy Conference will be held on May 14-15 in Orlando.

FARE’s comprehensive online headquarters -- http://www.foodallergyweek.org – includes a number of resources to help make Food Allergy Action Month a success in local communities, including:

  • Posters with the “React with Respect” theme that can be printed and posted in schools and community centers. A premium version of the poster, as well as teal ribbon stickers can be purchased from FARE’s online store.
  • A fact sheet handout from FARE that can be used to help others understand the serious nature and broad impact of food allergies.
  • Free “What You Can Do” shareable graphics that can help individuals spread the word online.
  • Be A PAL: Protect A Life educational materials to help teach children how to be a friend to someone with food allergies are available for free download. To accompany the free materials, Be a PAL pencils, stickers, and posters can be purchased in FARE’s online store.

Additional information will be announced throughout the month. For more information about Food Allergy Action Month and Food Allergy Awareness Week, please visit http://www.foodallergyweek.org.

ABOUT FARE
Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) works on behalf of the 15 million Americans with food allergies, including all those at risk for life-threatening anaphylaxis. This potentially deadly disease affects 1 in every 13 children in the U.S. – or roughly two in every classroom. FARE’s mission is to improve the quality of life and the health of individuals with food allergies, and to provide them hope through the promise of new treatments. Our work is organized around three core tenets: LIFE – support the ability of individuals with food allergies to live safe, productive lives with the respect of others through our education and advocacy initiatives; HEALTH – enhance the healthcare access of individuals with food allergies to state-of-the-art diagnosis and treatment; and HOPE – encourage and fund research in both industry and academia that promises new therapies to improve the allergic condition. For more information, please visit http://www.foodallergy.org.

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Nancy Gregory
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