Minecraft and Autism - New Opportunities in June for Students and Teachers with FreeGamePick

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Players can try Minecraft at absolutely no cost at FreeGamePick.

Minecraft and Autism Computational Thinking with Video Games FreeGamePick

Minecraft and Autism Computational Thinking with Video Games

The ability to play Minecraft for free while utilizing these complimentary classroom plans is a fantastic way to take game play to a whole new level. It not only adds an extra depth of enjoyment to young game enthusiasts.

The top games website, FreeGamePick has announced an exciting new opportunity for teachers and parents involving the hit game Minecraft. As of June, players can try Minecraft at absolutely no cost at FreeGamePick. Minecraft is one of the best-selling games for kids of all time. You have probably been introduced to it by kids in your own family, enthralled with creating worlds within worlds. Minecraft, the worldwide gaming force, not only entertains children but helps them learn about computer programming. Minecraft is now being integrated into the classroom by teachers across the globe to help their autistic students socialize, communicate and ultimately, better understand the real world.

On the surface, Minecraft is a very visual game, tapping into a child’s logic and creativity. However, it also involves visual memory in order to achieve success in particular levels and it encourages positive sensory behavior when virtually assembling pattern based environments. Performing these tasks helps kids feel calm and they also report a sense of achievement after playing the game. Teachers are now using computer games as learning tools within the classroom and they observe that when students collaborate in the multiplayer mode, they talk, share and network together to achieve their goals. This networking teaches valuable social lessons that can help them make sense of real world situations later on, whether they are inside or outside the classroom.

Since its launch seven years ago, Minecraft has become a global hit, with over 100 million registered players engages in this wholesome online world of virtual blocks. Luckily classroom time with these extra materials does not have to cost teachers or schools any additional money thanks to various online games and the ability to download Minecraft at no cost at FreeGamePick. By searching the Apple IBook’s store in June, there are now a multitude of classroom materials available that detail how to integrate the game into an educational plan for children on the autism spectrum. These complimentary classroom activities will be useful to parents, educators and students. Eric Powers, from FreeGamePick.net said, “The ability to play Minecraft for free while utilizing these complimentary classroom plans is a fantastic way to take game play to a whole new level. It not only adds an extra depth of enjoyment to young game enthusiasts, but it also helps teachers reach their students.” When using creativity and focus, children can be provided with fantastic tools to build their future.

Originally founded in 2008, FreeGamePick, (“FreeGamePick”), is one of the worlds largest producers of premium casual games. FreeGamePick is dedicated to bringing innovative entertainment to casual games throughout the world. FreeGamePick has served millions of gamers worldwide by providing fresh entertainment to each user, on any device. Due to FreeGamePick’s exclusive web platform, users can simply browse, select and play a large variety of free downloadable PC games, online in-browser and mobile games created by FreeGamePick’s wide network of exclusive partners and its internal game development department. FreeGamePick’s games are played in over 150 countries around the globe on many different devices across a dozen languages. The company is head quartered in Salt Lake City, Utah. For more information visit freegamepick.net

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Angelica Smuart
@FreeGamePick
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