E-Book to Support Anti-Smoking Fight Released by Georgia State School of Public Health

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A no-cost electronic book to assist researchers, practitioners, advocates, students and others interested in working to end smoking, one of the leading causes of death and disease globally, has been released by the School of Public Health at Georgia State University.

Dr. Michael Eriksen

Smoking causes more chronic diseases than people realize, including chronic bronchitis and emphysema, which are often included in the category of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

A free electronic book to assist researchers, practitioners, advocates, students and others interested in working to end smoking, one of the leading causes of death and disease globally, has been released by the School of Public Health at Georgia State University.

Dr. Michael Eriksen, dean of the School of Public Health, is the senior author of “Principles of Tobacco Control: Extinguishing the Habit,” which explores the history of tobacco as well as today’s urgent issues, from the rapid rise of novel tobacco products such as e-cigarettes to regulations surrounding tobacco use, marketing and other aspects of industry behavior. This digital publication also examines the harm caused by tobacco use and offers solutions for successful tobacco control.

The e-book, which is available in iBook format for Mac and iPad users, contains interactive features, including video, graphics and links to additional articles and reports and will be updated periodically. There is also a PDF version for users of PCs and other mobile devices, including iPhones and Android platform tablets and phones.

“This book is the culmination of two years of work to gather the most up-to-date information to help public health workers and others across the U.S. and around the world be more effective in their work to reduce smoking rates in their communities,” said Eriksen, an internationally recognized expert on tobacco research and policy.

“Smoking causes more chronic diseases than people realize, including chronic bronchitis and emphysema, which are often included in the category of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It has also been linked to diabetes mellitus and colorectal and stomach cancer. That’s why, as someone who has worked in tobacco control for decades, I felt it was important to make this resource free to everyone who shares the goal of eliminating the burden of smoking on individual smokers and society as a whole.”

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Leah Seupersad
Georgia State University
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