5 Keys to Reducing Harms from Opioids: Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety Releases Podcast with ECRI Institute

Share Article

ECRI Institute recently released the 2016 Top 10 Patient Safety Concerns for Healthcare Organizations. Of key significance among the top 10 patient safety concerns is the concern that has the greatest likelihood of preventable harm, which occurs when the patient receives opioids and is not monitored effectively and sufficiently.

Opioid Monitoring Risk Map

Opioid Monitoring Risk Map

More and more professional societies are issuing guidelines supporting the increased use of capnography for patient monitoring.

Past News Releases

RSS

The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) today released a podcast with ECRI Institute’s Patient Safety Analyst, Stephanie Uses, PharmD, MJ, JD. The podcast can be heard on YouTube by going to https://youtu.be/Z5xiuUaIykM

ECRI Institute recently released the 2016 Top 10 Patient Safety Concerns for Healthcare Organizations.

Of key significance among the top 10 patient safety concerns is the concern that has the greatest likelihood of preventable harm. This may occur when the patient receives opioids and is not monitored effectively and sufficiently. ECRI says that inadequate monitoring for respiratory depression in patients receiving opioids poses the greatest risk to patients and assigned it a risk map of 80.

The discussion with Ms. Uses, Lynn Razzano, (RN, MSN, ONCC) and Michael Wong, JD of PPAHS focused on 5 keys to reducing opioid harm:

1. Detecting Patient Deterioration as Early as Possible
2. Monitoring with Capnography
3. Ensuring Highest Risk Patients are Monitored
4. Utilizing Reminder Alerts to Monitor Patients
5. Empowering Nurses to Drive the Protocol

Regarding early detection of a patient’s deteriorating condition allows for timely intervention, Ms. Uses said, “Studies have shown and practice has shown that monitoring can lead to early recognition of respiratory depression. And with the early recognition of respiratory depression, it's reversible when recognized at an early stage. It's when patients have continued hypoxia that they're going to be running into problems. But, if we catch them early, hopefully we can reverse them.”

On the role of capnography in reducing opioid harm, Ms. Razzano pointed out two prominent nursing societies that have recommended the routine use of capnography – “More and more professional societies are issuing guidelines supporting the increased use of capnography for patient monitoring. In January '15, the Association of periOperative Registered Nurses (AORN) released a moderate sedation guideline update saying that perioperative nurse should monitor exhaled CO2, end-tidal CO2, by capnography in addition to SP02 by pulse proximity during moderate sedation analgesia procedures. This was also identified in January 2015 by the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing stating that it endorses the routine use of capnography for all patients who receive moderate sedation analgesia during procedures in the imaging environment.”

To listen to the entire discussion on YouTube, please here.

For a transcript of the discussion, please click here.

About Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety

Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety is a non-profit 501(c)(3) whose mission is to promote safer clinical practices and standards for patients through collaboration among healthcare experts, professionals, scientific researchers, and others, in order to improve health care delivery. For more information, please go to http://www.ppahs.org

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Visit website