Atomic Force Microscope Leader Park Systems Presents Webinar on Electrochemical Scanned Probes June 16, 2016

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Park Systems, worldleader in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is offering a nanotechnology webinar titled Electrochemical Scanned Probes on June 16, 2016 at 9am PST which will discuss electrochemical scanned probes and related scanning probe microscopy techniques that are presently popular, including electrochemical atomic force microscopy, scanning electrochemical microscopy, and scanning ion conductance microscopy. “Park NanoAcademy is proud to offer this exciting series of webinars on electrochemistry which is a rapidly advancing nanoscientific field of study,” comments Keibock Lee, President of Park Systems.

Nanopore Membrane SICM topography and SECM electrochemical images of nanopore membrane sample Image Credit: Baker Group, Indiana University

Electrochemistry and improving electrochemical materials is a driver for materials science where advances at the nanoscale continuously results in exciting new products, research methods and applications.

Park Systems, worldleader in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is offering a nanotechnology webinar titled Electrochemical Scanned Probes on June 16, 2016 at 9am PST. Electrochemistry and improving electrochemical materials is a driver for materials science where advances at the nanoscale continuously results in exciting new products, research methods and applications.

This webinar will discuss electrochemical scanned probes and related scanning probe microscopy techniques that are presently popular, including electrochemical atomic force microscopy, scanning electrochemical microscopy, and scanning ion conductance microscopy.

The presenter for the webinar is Prof. Lane Baker, the James F. Jackson Associate Professor of Chemistry at Indiana University. Versed in various electrochemical methods for sample analysis and imaging, Prof. Baker has been applying his knowledge to further nanopore use in developing chemically and biochemically selective membranes, sensors, and new electrochemical imaging techniques.

“Electrochemical scanned probes are typically very small electrodes that can be positioned – or scanned – at an interface with high precision positioning equipment. By moving the electrode to the area of interest, the signal can be enhanced (e.g. not diluted from diffusion) and the picture of the smaller parts of a larger sample can be developed,” explains Prof.. Baker, who leads the Baker Group at Indiana University, a group of analytical and materials chemists whose research covers a broad area of topics in electrochemistry, bioanalytical chemistry, new mass spectrometry methods, materials for electrode fabrication, and instrumentation development.

In this webinar, Prof. Baker will discuss SECM, SECM-SICM, and EC-AFM, which are the most intuitive ways to use EC-scanned probes. “One of the key advantages is the electrochemical signal recorded is inherently decoupled from the imaging/feedback mechanism, which can often simplify or enhance the data recorded,” explains Prof. Baker.

This webinar is part of an ongoing series offered by Park Systems’ Nano Academy, a platform for providing education and shared knowledge on the latest nanotechnology advancements.

“Park NanoAcademy is proud to offer this exciting series of webinars on electrochemistry which is a rapidly advancing nanoscientific field of study,” comments Keibock Lee, President of Park Systems. “Scanning tunneling microscopy heralded a new era of imaging and opened the door to a variety of subsequent imaging platforms that make use of electrochemical conductivities and faradaic electrochemical processes. These techniques provide new vistas into interfacial electrochemistry important for energy technology, biology, and fundamental science.”

To register for this webinar, go to: http://www.parkafm.com/webinar-16june2016

About Park Systems

Park Systems is a world-leading manufacturer of atomic force microscopy (AFM) systems with a complete range of products for researchers and industry engineers in chemistry, materials, physics, life sciences, semiconductor and data storage industries. Park’s products are used by over a thousand of institutions and corporations worldwide. Park’s AFM provides highest data accuracy at nanoscale resolution, superior productivity, and lowest operating cost thanks to its unique technology and innovative engineering. Park Systems, Inc. is headquartered in Santa Clara, California with its global manufacturing, and R&D headquarters in Korea. Park’s products are sold and supported worldwide with regional headquarters in the US, Korea, Japan, and Singapore, and distribution partners throughout Europe, Asia, and America. Please visit http://www.parkafm.com or call 408-986-1110 for more information.

About Professor Lane Baker

Prof. Lane Baker, the James F. Jackson Associate Professor of Chemistry at Indiana University, received a B.S. degree from Missouri State University in 1996. He was awarded his Ph.D. degree at Texas A&M University in 2001 working with Richard M. Crooks. He was then awarded a National Research Council Postdoctoral Associateship to study scanning probe microscopes with Lloyd J. Whitman at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C. He studied nanopore membranes and single nanopore platforms as a postdoctoral associate with Charles R. Martin at the University of Florida. His website is at: http://www.indiana.edu/~bakergrp/wordpress/

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