CDHA Does Not Sign ADHA Charter and Votes to Breakaway from ADHA

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CDHA declines to sign ADHA's charter and will now stand independently for all California Dental Hygienists

www.cdha.org

ADHA presented CDHA with a new written Charter agreement which would have imposed significant new obligations on both CDHA and its Components while providing virtually no additional benefits.

At the California Dental Hygienists’ Association’s (CDHA) House of Delegates meeting on June 4 in Fresno, California, CDHA made the decision not to sign the proposed American Dental Hygienists’ Association (ADHA) charter and voted to sever ties between the two organizations.

ADHA presented CDHA with a new written Charter agreement which would have imposed significant new obligations on both CDHA and its Components while providing virtually no additional benefits. CDHA contacted ADHA numerous times and requested to work with ADHA on creating a document that would not negatively impact CDHA’s organizational structure or its components. ADHA denied the request and confirmed at the House of Delegates meeting that it will not change the proposed charter language for California.

For the following reasons, CDHA declined to sign the charter and voted to break away from ADHA:

1) CDHA would have had to surrender its assets and records to ADHA in the event that the charter ever is revoked.

2) CDHA’s unincorporated components would have had to surrender their assets and records, requiring CDHA to manage all activities, resulting in increased administration costs.

3) CDHA would have to obtain written authorization from ADHA for approval of any bylaw changes or dues increases.

4) CDHA would experience a significant decrease in dues revenue, as ADHA would be imposing an annual $4.50 administrative fee per member.

California was one of the first states to create the independent dental hygiene professional, the Registered Dental Hygienist in Alternative Practice (RDHAP) and they also wrote legislation that established a regulating body specific to dental hygiene, the Dental Hygiene Committee of California (DHCC). The proposed charter would have stripped CDHA from its governing autonomy and prevented some components’ ability to advance the dental hygiene profession by limiting networking opportunities.

“CDHA remains committed to being the leading voice and representation of dental hygienists throughout California,” said Julie Coan, CDHA President.

kelly(at)marketplacecommunications(dot)com

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