Tyler Perry's 'Good Deeds' in Appeal Court with Author Terri Strickland-Donald over Copyrights Dismissal

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Filmmaker Tyler Perry of the film “Good Deeds” is still in court in Atlanta District Court Case no. 1-15-CV-3400 with author Terri Strickland-Donald, writer of the book “Bad Apples Can Be Good Fruit.” The author is appealing a second dismissal in the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta, GA.

Terri Wants A Fair Trial! God is watching over her...

Filmmaker Tyler Perry of the film “Good Deeds,” released in 2012, which was said to gross over $59,000,000.00, is still in court in the Atlanta District Court found under Case no. 1-15-CV-3400 with author Terri Strickland-Donald, writer of the book “Bad Apples Can Be Good Fruit," written in 2007.

The author is appealing a second dismissal in the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta, GA. The court documents for appeal Case no. 16-11601 illustrates evidence that allegedly substantiates similarities in both the book and the film by Strickland and Perry, respectively.

The appeals court papers suggest that Strickland refuses to let the case rest in favor of Perry. Perry allegedly remixed the book and Strickland alleges over 48 pages of similarities.

Court documents for the Northern District Court of Georgia demonstrate over 50 documents where Perry and Strickland go back and forth in legal arguments to plead their case.

Strickland allegedly submitted substantial similarities with book page numbers against scenes of the film. The documents bolstered heavily of evidence being ignored.

In court documents for the New York case no. 1-13-CV-1565 between Strickland and Tyler Perry Studios and Lionsgate for dismissal, Strickland (formerly “Donald”) alleged none of the evidence made it into the case or was considered.

According to court documents, Strickland was stationed at OSAN Airbase Hospital in South Korea between 2012-2013, and, during which time, her condition allegedly rendered her incapable of making any highly technical decisions, around the same time Perry's film was released.

The Georgia District Court issued a decision to dismiss the second Civil Action filed by Strickland in September 2015, stating that the case was already heard in New York. Court records, however, state that case no. 1-15-CV-3400 is different in nature, the evidence is different and a trial by jury is in order.

In the civil suit, Strickland alleges she learned about Perry allegedly claiming writer’s credits on the film in July 2014, which is considered new information.

The prior argument says that the Tyler Perry Production Studio and the film company Lionsgate Entertainment produced/distributed the film whereas the current Georgia case is aimed at Perry, the individual.

If this case is overturned, it could demonstrate a different perspective of how people can possibly perceive all of the other cases filed against Perry that claimed the writer allegedly infringed upon their works.

Court documents say a protective order was allegedly filed by Perry when Strickland asked questions regarding whether or not Perry wrote all of his own work. The documents say Perry allegedly failed to answer the questions for discovery, citing embarrassment.

Immediately after Strickland asked Perry to respond, the case was dismissed on March 24, 2016, and then quickly appealed by Strickland to the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals.

Strickland stated in an interview with BOSSIP last October 2015 that she was only interested in having her day in court.

From the court documents, Strickland seems to be willing to go upwards in the judicial process. To anyone looking in on this case, it appears to be less of a game and more of a person seeking justice.

A take away to ponder: At the end of the “Good Deeds,” the film's credits reads, “The persons and events in this motion picture are fictitious, any similarity or actual persons or events is unintentional."

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Wardell Mitchell
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