SilverTribe Responds to Recent Copyright Lawsuit Against Budweiser

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SilverTribe.com recognizes and responds to the importance of Native American symbolism during battles for copyright and culture across the country after Budweiser copyright infringement.

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Symbols are more than just patterns to the people of Native American heritage; they are living pieces of history that are often considered sacred.

According to an article published by FoxNews, published June 16th, Budweiser is currently facing a pending copyright infringement lawsuit from the Lumbee tribe. States around the country have been forced to change their perspective in a more progressive time that acknowledges the importance of history and culture. The popular brewing company, Budweiser, is facing charges (Civil Action No. 7:16-cv-148) for their use of both the Lumbee Tribe’s logo and slogan “Heritage, Pride, and Strength” on their products without the Tribe's consent.

Silvertribe.com, a jewelry store who prominently fetaures Native American artists and their work, recognizes this is not something new. While promoting aspects of a culture is great, it does need to be done in the right way. Silvertribe.com spokesman, Chris Anderson, gave a statement on the importance of culture after the news of Budweiser and the Lumbee was announced,

“Symbols are more than just patterns to the people of Native American heritage; they are living pieces of history that are often considered sacred. Using them to promote a product is fine, but it does need to be done in a way that respects the culture and gives credit to the peoples involved.”

The team at SilverTribe.com has a history of working with Native American jewelry artists, like Zuni artisan Effie Calavaza, who is renowned for her use of the snake (a symbol of rainfall, fertility, and healing) in her jewelry. Symbols serve a distinct purpose in Native American culture and must be respected.

Anderson and the team at SilverTribe.com believe there can be a peaceful coexistence with commerce and Native American culture. They want to be an example for other business that wish to feature Native icons, art, and symbols with their products. Anderson and his team work with Native artists in a way that puts their culture first. These pieces are the foremost feature of SilverTribe’s inventory and artists are always given credit for their work.

While other companies continue to feature Native American headdresses and other facets, like the Washington Redskins, the fashion industry selling patterns as “Tribal Clothing,” and Budweiser’s use of the Lumbee Tribes logo, it’s important to learn the significance of these symbols first and work with the community to promote business the right way. SilverTribe.com hopes that these organizations will reach out to the Tribes they try to emulate and learn more about the proper use of these symbols.

SilverTribe, while respecting the quality and talent of these organizations and companies, urges them to learn and interact with the Native community, so they can receive the proper credit. Anderson believes this is the only way to do business with different cultures in the modern era.

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Chris Anderson
SilverTribe
+1 888-659-2227
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SilverTribe Native American Jewelry
since: 05/2010
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