British Customs Delves Into Design Heritage Of Air-Cooled Triumph Motorcycles In New “Wrencher’s Digest” Tech Tips Series Article

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British Customs compares the technical design heritage of Triumph’s air-cooled and liquid-cooled motorcycles in their new "Wrencher’s Digest” tech tips series article.

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The air-cooled models’ designs are much closer to the vintage designs than the liquid-cooled models’ designs, British Customs asserts, and the most authentic modern classics are the air-cooled carbureted models.

The motorcycle industry is constantly changing, and for OEMs like Triumph that stand on over a hundred years of heritage and tradition, change is something that can cause quite an uproar. Triumph's transition from using air-cooled to liquid-cooled motorcycles has not only been the center of much debate, but has also left many questioning what exactly are the differences between the two platforms. British Customs has launched a new series on their blog called "Wrencher's Digest," and the first articles of that series dissect the differences between air-cooled and liquid-cooled motorcycles to help riders better understand the platforms and choose which is better suited to them.

In the second article in British Customs’ technical series "Wrencher's Digest", they dig into the technical design heritage of air-cooled and liquid-cooled motorcycles to reveal some surprising truths.

The second of the series examines the design heritage of Triumph’s air-cooled and liquid-cooled motorcycles.

The air-cooled models’ designs are much closer to the vintage designs than the liquid-cooled models’ designs, British Customs asserts, and the most authentic modern classics are the air-cooled carbureted models. The carbureted air-cooled modern classics are much closer to the motorcycles ridden by icons and legends like Steve McQueen and Eddie Mulder in the golden age of motorcycling, which were also carbureted and air-cooled.

Nearly everything on a carbureted bike is mechanical, and can be worked on with one’s hands, instead of requiring a computer and specialized software like some of the fuel injected liquid-cooled models do.

In that vein, the air-cooled bikes have a sense of authenticity that goes beyond their appearance. Air-cooled engines have a distinctive, timeless aesthetic that comes from the functionality of their design: they look the way they do because of their elegantly simple design. The beautifully sanded cooling fins are there because they keep the bike cool, not because they want to create the impression that it’s a retro-style motorcycle. The liquid-cooled bikes also have fins, but they’re just there for looks. The odd design discrepancies don’t stop there, British Customs tells us.

In the end, all the motorcycle platforms available from Triumph are great, but each is meant for a very different kind of rider. To find out which platform is right for what kind of motorcycle enthusiast, visit the British Customs blog every Wednesday throughout this month for new articles covering the differences between the various types of motorcycles made by Triumph.

About British Customs:
British Customs is a Southern California-based lifestyle brand and designer of aftermarket motorcycle parts. They are known for making the highest quality factory-spec bolt-on parts that only require common tools and minimal technical knowledge to install. With any of their parts upgrades, the average rider can completely customize his or her motorcycle in a weekend.

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David Bumpus
Triton Communications
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David Bumpus

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