Can You Tell The Difference? British Customs Publishes Next Installment Of "Wrencher's Digest" Series Demystifying Differences Between Carbureted And EFI Motorcycles

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British Customs discusses the differences between carbureted and fuel injected motorcycles, and what those differences mean for riders, in their “Wrencher’s Digest” tech tips series.

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Are those carburetors or not? Can you tell the difference?

British Customs’ technical series highlights the distinguishing features, differences, benefits, and disadvantages of both carbureted and fuel injected platforms in easy to follow terms for their readers.

The motorcycle market is constantly changing as new technologies and materials are developed, and consumers often follow in suit reaching for the latest and greatest. However, many motorcycle enthusiasts are sticking to their older air-cooled, carbureted motorcycles in spite of the direction the industry is going. While many write such riders off as stubborn, British Customs delves into why many of the leading custom motorcycle builders prefer to work with air-cooled carbureted models.

British Customs’ technical series "Wrencher's Digest" highlights the distinguishing features, differences, benefits, and disadvantages of both carbureted and fuel injected platforms in easy to follow terms for their readers.

The fourth installment of the series examines the differences between carbureted and fuel injected motorcycles, and what those differences mean for motorcyclists.

Simply put, carbureted motorcycles are purely mechanical, and fuel injected motorcycles rely on digital platforms to manage fuel delivery. What this means for motorcycle owners is that carbureted motorcycle engines can be tuned by hand with basic tools, and fuel injected motorcycles require specialized software and electronic components in order to be worked on. The extent of carbureted motorcycle’s range of accessibility doesn’t end with engine tuning, however, but also includes being able to adjust for a rough idle or a hard start by merely adjusting the choke, which cannot be done on a fuel injected motorcycle without a computer.

Riders who want to be able to work on their own motorcycle in their own garage tend to gravitate towards carbureted models for their accessibility, where riders who are happier letting the motorcycle manage itself are drawn to fuel injected models.

In the end, all the motorcycle platforms available from Triumph are great, but each is meant for a very different kind of rider. To find out which platform is right for what kind of motorcycle enthusiast, visit the British Customs blog every Wednesday throughout this month for new articles covering the differences between the various types of motorcycles made by Triumph.

About British Customs:
British Customs is a Southern California-based lifestyle brand and designer of aftermarket motorcycle parts. They are known for making the highest quality factory-spec bolt-on parts that only require common tools and minimal technical knowledge to install. With any of their parts upgrades, the average rider can completely customize his or her motorcycle in a weekend.

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David Bumpus
Triton Communications
+1 3104368012
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David Bumpus

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