University of Tokyo's Exclusive Hachi-Kou Sculpture to be Sited in NJ at Abbey Glen Pet Memorial Park

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Abbey Glen Pet Memorial Park, a premier aftercare service facility offering exclusive cremation and pet burial services to veterinarians and pet owners for over 40 years, has been selected to receive an exclusive reproduction of the life-size Hachi-kou and Professor Ueno statue recently unveiled in Japan at The University of Tokyo.

NJ's Abbey Glen Pet Memorial to be the home of an exclusive replica of this statue recently unveiled at The University of Tokyo

Hachi-kou and Professor Ueno Statue at The University of Tokyo

“The meaning behind this statue aligns well with Abbey Glen’s mission – to memorialize the unique and valued relationships that exist between man and animal,” said Derek Cooke, president of family-owned Abbey Glen.

Abbey Glen Pet Memorial Park, a premier aftercare service facility offering exclusive cremation and pet burial services to veterinarians and pet owners for over 40 years, has been selected to receive an exclusive reproduction of the life-size Hachi-kou and Professor Ueno statue recently unveiled in Japan at The University of Tokyo.

The life-size monument, exclusive to the U.S., will be featured prominently on Abbey Glen’s 14-acre cemetery in Lafayette, NJ and unveiled during a dedication ceremony Sunday, October 9th at 12:00pm.

Hachi-kou is a Japanese icon, and his story is an important part of Japanese culture. Hachi-kou, a beautiful and faithful Akita, was given to his owner, Professor Ueno, at just eight weeks old. For years, local residents watched Hachi-kou and Professor Ueno, who taught Agricultural Engineering at The University of Tokyo, together and walking side by side. Hachi-kou regularly accompanied his master to the Shibuya train station and returned in the evening to greet him for their walk home. Professor Ueno died suddenly in 1925 from a cerebral hemorrhage, but Hachi-kou returned to the same spot in front of the train station waiting for his master each and every day for nearly 10 years, until his own death in 1935. This story inspired the book, “Reminiscence of Shibuya” by Yumi McDonald as well as the Richard Gere film, “Hachi, A Dog’s Tale.” Hachi-kou’s legendary loyalty has made him the hero in many Japanese children’s stories. He was immortalized with a statue in front of Shibuya station in 1934 while he was still alive. On March 8th 2015, on the 80th anniversary of his death, a statue of professor Ueno and Hachi-kou hugging and rejoicing together was erected at The University of Tokyo’s campus.

“The meaning behind this statue aligns well with Abbey Glen’s mission – to memorialize the unique and valued relationships that exist between man and animal,” said Derek Cooke, president of family-owned Abbey Glen. “We’re honored to have been selected as the home for what is a true symbol of the human - animal companion bond. We know that all of those wonderful and compassionate people whom we serve will enjoy the statue for years to come,” he concluded.

The statue unveiling and dedication will take place on October 9th at 12:00pm, at Abbey Glen Pet Memorial Park, 187 Route 94, Lafayette, NJ, with special presenters Ambassador Reiichiro Takahashi from the Consul General of Japan in New York City, along with Mrs. Yumi McDonald the author of “Reminiscence of Shibuya”. Learn more about Abbey Glen.

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Christine Spigai
On The Mark Communications
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