TenantScreeningUSA.com Comments on Eviction Activity Across the United States

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Changes in law, such as those governing evictions, can greatly affect the use of public records as part of the tenant screening process and often changes to law lead to confusion for landlords and property managers. Adam Almeida, President and CEO of TenantScreeningUSA.com in commenting on potential eviction law change and related challenges, comments: "Evictions are a useful tool for landlords and property managers but the potential of change to these laws can create confusion thereby highlighting the great need to use a third-party background screening company for all tenant screening."

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The two examples herein point to an immediate and urgent need for managers of rental properties to work with third-party tenant screening companies in order to understand the legal and lawful use of evictions as part of a tenant background check.

Eviction laws greatly assist landlords and property managers in vacating tenants that do not pay on time or do not adhere to laws and rules governing a rental property. However, changes in eviction law can greatly affect the use of eviction reports and documents and create confusion for landlords over the legal and lawful use of such reports.

Adam Almeida, President and CEO of TenantScreeningUSA.com comments on recent eviction activity in the United States, stating: "Eviction law can change. From New York City to Oregon and throughout the country eviction laws evolve, change, and can become confusing to landlords and property managers. It is important to highlight the immediate and urgent need to always maintain full compliance with evolutionary law."

Recently, in New York City, the NYPD challenged proposed changes to eviction law.

From the New York Post (NYPost.com; Nov 3, 16)

Top NYPD officials pushed back Wednesday against proposals to alter nuisance-abatement laws that allow the city to evict tenants engaged in illegal activity.

Bills before the City Council would require cops to document four instances of drug-selling or other law-breaking at a specific location — instead of the current three — to trigger evictions. (1)

Almeida comments: "An eviction based on illegal activity is certainly valid, but the collection of this information is onerous on the police force. Further, an overzealous landlord might find fault in relatively minor infractions. A law governing this form of eviction could, itself, become onerous and over-reaching due to the need for great specificity as to what would be considered legal and illegal activity."

In Oregon the rental crisis has grown. The lack of rental units has caused considerable challenge to potential renters. But existing renters face challenges based on the lack of rental units: No-cause eviction.

A no-cause eviction is just what it sounds like and is a powerful tool utilized by landlords and property managers. But the use of this tool has caused great concern in Salem, Oregon. Subsequently, relationships between landlords and tenants has grown fraught with tension. A coalition between landlords and tenants fell apart and the potential for new law has increased.

From the Portland Tribune (PortlandTribune.com; Nov. 3, 16):

... landlords won’t give up no-cause evictions. Sometimes investors buy apartments at a higher price than current rents justify, ..., and need to clear units to make major upgrades and fetch higher rents. Landlords also need to protect their tenants, such as when a neighbor plays drums too loudly at night. If landlords are forced to defend such evictions in court ... it unduly delays the process, and landlords have to prove their case, often without the help of tenants afraid to testify against their neighbors. (2)

Almeida comments: "The situation in Oregon could lead to unruly laws governing the use of evictions, laws that would stymie most landlords and point to the immediate need to work with a third-party tenant screening company that would be well versed in all points of law as related to tenant screening."

"In the end," Almeida comments, "the two examples herein point to an immediate and urgent need for managers of rental properties to work with third-party tenant screening companies in order to understand the legal and lawful use of evictions as part of a tenant background check. As noted, law can change over any related eviction issue and often are cumbersome, challenging items. A best practice is to always work with a third-party tenant screening company in order to stay fully compliant with current and potential laws governing tenant screening."

TenantScreeningUSA.com is a third-party tenant screening company with a highly trained and experienced staff fully versed in the laws that govern tenant screening on a state and federal level. Utilizing the most current data, TenantScreeningUSA.com can provide landlords and property managers information necessary to make a knowledgeable and compliant decision regarding perspective tenants.

Notes:

(1)    nypost.com/2016/11/03/nypd-officials-push-back-against-eviction-law-changes/
(2)    portlandtribune.com/pt/9-news/330296-209264-landlord-tenant-war-looms-in-salem-as-key-coalitions-blow-up

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