King Kullen Recommends Eating More Seasonal Vegetables for Thanksgiving

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The local grocer shares healthy seasonal recipes to try this autumn.

‘Tis the season to discover a new Thanksgiving favorite and add some variety to weekly meal preparation. November is National Squash Month and Sweet Potato Awareness Month, making it the perfect time to cut down on carbs and fill up on healthy alternatives that are just as tasty as the classics– if not more.

With that in mind, King Kullen is offering some seasonally-inspired recipes to try. All of the necessary ingredients can be found at any of the local grocer’s locations.

Acorn Squash

With cold and flu season around the corner, a healthy, balanced diet is even more important. King Kullen’s Nutritionist, Michele Tonner, explains that this popular autumn squash contains vitamins A and C, dietary fiber and potassium.

Increased servings of this seasonal vegetable helps people stay fuller longer, can boost the immune system, regulate the digestive system and lower and regulate blood pressure.

Acorn squash can be prepared many different ways, whether it’s baked, roasted or stuffed with added protein, like quinoa and chicken sausage, macaroni and cheese, or turkey stuffing. Acorn squash can also be pureed and used in soups, sauces, pies and dips.

For a snack that’s vegan, vegetarian and low-calorie, try this yummy recipe for Acorn Squash Hummus (https://www.pinterest.com/pin/199917670938366804/).

Butternut Squash

With only 82 calories per cup, baked butternut squash is healthy and contains vitamins A, C and B6 as well as magnesium, according to Tonner. Plus, King Kullen’s Director of Produce, Rich Conger, explains that butternut squash is easy to prepare – cube and roast in the oven, season with favorite spices, such as maple cinnamon, garlic parmesan and rosemary.

Pureed butternut squash can be incorporated into all kinds of meals, including baked mac and cheese, oatmeal, muffins, pies and dips.

Tracey Cullen, Director of Pricing and Social Media, notes that pureed butternut squash is a great vegetable to “sneak” into a picky toddler’s meals – it’s very easy to add to pasta, macaroni and cheese, or sneak into a quesadilla instead of or in addition to cheese.

Stay warm with this simple, healthy recipe for Roasted Butternut Squash Soup (https://www.pinterest.com/pin/199917670938438832/). Despite containing no cream, milk or butter, this seasonal soup is very tasty and full of flavor.

King Kullen carries butternut squash noodles, which can be prepared just like pasta with sauce, browned butter or spices. Try Creamy Butternut Squash Noodles with Bacon and Spinach (https://www.pinterest.com/pin/199917670938477212/) for a healthy, but delicious alternative to traditional pasta dishes.

Spaghetti Squash

Swap pasta noodles in favor of spaghetti squash for a low-calorie alternative–only 41 calories per cup– that contains vitamin C, several B vitamins, potassium and magnesium. This Spaghetti Squash recipe (https://www.pinterest.com/pin/199917670934666625/) creates long noodles that actually look like pasta noodles.

Pumpkins

Pumpkins are much more than a festive fall decoration; they are also a good source of dietary fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C and potassium. Pumpkin puree can easily be added to morning smoothies, bowls of oatmeal and fall desserts for added festive flavor.

Don’t forget pumpkin spice lattes. Skip the line at the local coffee shop by trying this Pumpkin Spice Latte (https://www.pinterest.com/pin/199917670938395917/) recipe at home, made with real pumpkin puree.

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are a very versatile vegetable, as they can be baked, roasted, pureed, mashed, steamed or grilled. Plus, they are high in vitamins B6, C and D as well as iron, magnesium and potassium, offering benefits such as reduced risk of heart attack, a healthier immune system and increased energy levels.

Sweet potatoes can be used in all kinds of recipes, including soups, salads or as standalone side dishes.

Stray from the buttery classic with this recipe for Black Bean Stuffed Sweet Potatoes (https://www.pinterest.com/pin/199917670938118056/). This unique combination is vegan, gluten-free and packed with healthy proteins.

For a healthy dish that’s still rich and creamy, try this recipe for Sweet Potato Pasta with Kale Pesto (https://www.pinterest.com/pin/199917670938477241/).

Traditional seasonings get old. Instead, try garlic parmesan, BBQ, Cajun or Greek feta on sweet potato fries for added flavor. For added flavor, serve with different dips such as avocado, chipotle, sriracha or pesto mayo. Start with this easy recipe for Greek Feta Sweet Potato Fries (https://www.pinterest.com/pin/199917670938477223/) that makes for a crispy and delicious side dish.

A Healthier Autumn Season
Conger notes that King Kullen’s produce department offers are diced butternut squash, diced butternut for soup and butternut squash for roasting – these items are pre-cut and packaged for easy grab-and-go meals or side dishes. Customers can also find sweet potato fries, sweet potato noodles and sweet potatoes ready for roasting.

The holiday season is just the right time to give new recipes a try. Stop by a local King Kullen Grocery store to pick up everything needed to make these recipes for friends and family this season.

About the Company:
Headquartered in Bethpage, New York, King Kullen Grocery Co., Inc. is recognized by the Smithsonian Institution as America’s first supermarket. Michael J. Cullen opened the doors of King Kullen in 1930. Today, four generations later, King Kullen is still family owned and operated. It remains a leader in the supermarket industry. From that very first store in 1930, King Kullen today operates 34 supermarkets and five Wild by Nature stores across Long Island. In addition to traditional grocery, King Kullen features a large catering and prepared foods department, freshly-baked breads and sweets, and healthy and organic areas, with pharmacies and online shopping in many stores as well.

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Tracey Cullen
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