ASHA Offers “Digital Diet” at 2017 Consumer Electronics Show to Help Families Find Balance, Prioritize Communication in Tech-Heavy World

Share Article

With the latest and greatest technologies on display at the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) beginning today, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) is in Las Vegas to promote a “Digital Diet” to help tech insiders and the public at large find time for communication and human interaction in an always-connected world.

News Image

With the latest and greatest technologies on display at the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) beginning today, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) is in Las Vegas to promote a “Digital Diet” to help tech insiders and the public at large find time for communication and human interaction in an always-connected world.

Watch the ASHA Video—Balancing Act: Technology & Family Life
ASHA has attended CES since 2008 with its Listen To Your Buds campaign, which promotes safe listening practices to prevent noise-induced hearing loss from misuse of technology devices (i.e., listening at too loud volumes for too long). The Consumer Technology Association (CTA) is a sponsor of the Buds campaign. The campaign’s hearing protection tips include keeping the volume turned to half level and taking listening breaks—particularly when using ear buds or headphones.

ASHA’s Digital Diet is an expansion of the hearing protection message into the area of speech and communication. Today, as even the youngest of children now use tablets and other technology devices, ASHA members have indicated concern. According to a 2016 poll, these communication experts (speech-language pathologists and audiologists) agree that current tech habits, if left unchecked, could produce a “time bomb” that manifests in the form of diminished communication abilities and skills.

The “time bomb” encompasses speech and language development, which is dependent on adequate time for verbal exchange such as listening, talking, reading, and interacting with parents—interactions that technology cannot duplicate—and hearing loss, which impedes communication, academic and social success.

New research has pointed to specific areas related to communication that technology can negatively impact, including language development, attention span, school performance, and hearing problems.

While recognizing the tremendous opportunities that technology provides, CES affords a chance to encourage some basic steps to maintain balance. For more information, contact pr(at)asha(dot)org.

About the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)
ASHA is the national professional, scientific, and credentialing association for 186,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Audiologists specialize in preventing and assessing hearing and balance disorders as well as providing audiologic treatment, including hearing aids. Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat speech and language problems, including swallowing disorders. http://www.asha.org

View all ASHA press releases at http://www.asha.org/about/news.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Francine Pierson
ASHA
+1 301-296-8715
Email >