2017 iaedp Symposium: “Door-in-the-Face” Strategies Debunk Myth about Ambivalence in Eating Disorder Recovery

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In the presentation, “Door-in-the-Face: Engagement Strategies for Engaging Clients in Treatment,” primary presenter, Karlee McGlone, LMFT, and co-presenter, Anne Cusack, PsyD, show that instead of ambivalence being a hindrance to starting evidence-based treatment, clinicians can utilize the motivation that is present and capitalize on it by working with the patient to commit to the process, not the outcome.

It is not uncommon for adults with eating disorders to be ambivalent about treatment. While ambivalence usually designates contradictory feelings for eating disorder recovery, experiencing ambivalence is a good thing. Researchers have found that ambivalent patients are curious about engaging in change.

In the presentation, “Door-in-the-Face: Engagement Strategies for Engaging Clients in Treatment,” primary presenter, Karlee McGlone, LMFT, and co-presenter, Anne Cusack, PsyD, show that instead of ambivalence being a hindrance to starting evidence-based treatment, clinicians can utilize the motivation that is present and capitalize on it by working with the patient to commit to the process, not the outcome.

In all, this workshop and 60 others are part of the program at the 31st annual iaedp Symposium in Las Vegas at the Green Valley Resort from March 22 – 26. The McGlone-Cusack presentation is scheduled for Friday, March 24. To review the Symposium presentation line up in its entirety, go to http://www.iaedp.com.

This clinical case presentation will provide a deeper understanding of the strategies within the therapeutic approaches and highlight what doors to shut and what doors to open. The presenters will direct the workshop audience to practice techniques, specifically to roll with resistance while increasing a patient’s commitment.

According to presenters McGlone and Cusack, working with a patient to engage in treatment is the first step toward recovery, and it is not necessary to have the patient bought in to recovery, but to have the patient committed to treatment.

The presenters intend to change the way clinicians conceptualize ambivalence to work with patients more effectively throughout the process of engaging in treatment. Their goal is to debunk the common clinical notion that a patient must hit rock bottom or be fully motivated to recover in order to effectively engage.

About the iaedp Foundation: Established in 1985, iaedp is recognized for its excellence in providing education and training standards to an international multidisciplinary group of healthcare treatment providers who treat the full spectrum of eating disorder problems, from anorexia to bulimia to binge eating and obesity. The organization offers a rigorous certification process for those who wish to receive specialized credentials in their work with people with eating disorders. For more information about iaedp, visit http://www.iaedp.com.

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Susan Lomelino
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