Binge-eating disorder: What's the best treatment? At 2017 iaedp Symposium, Researchers Debate Whether to Tackle Psychological or Weight Issues First

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The panel presentation, “But I Want to Lose Weight! Addressing Weight Concerns in Your Clients with Binge Eating Disorder. Personal, Professional and Theoretical Insights,” reviews how helping clients find freedom from weight obsessions to heal their relationship with food and their bodies and to find their way to recovery from BED through behaviors that support overall health and wellness.

Concern about weight status and a desire to lose weight are common in individuals with binge eating disorder (BED) and, in fact, may be the very factors that contribute to the development of the disorder. Moreover, weight gain is often an outcome of binge eating, which further intensifies the focus on weight.

To compensate for binges, individuals frequently try to restrict intake following a binge to gain control, leading to extreme feelings of deprivation, which sets the stage for more binging. As a result, individuals feel trapped in this cycle of binging, driven by the desire to control their weight.

The panel presentation, “But I Want to Lose Weight! Addressing Weight Concerns in Your Clients with Binge Eating Disorder. Personal, Professional and Theoretical Insights,” reviews how helping clients find freedom from weight obsessions to heal their relationship with food and their bodies and to find their way to recovery from BED through behaviors that support overall health and wellness.
The presentation will be delivered at the 2017 iaedp Symposium and will be led by Kari Anderson, DBH, LPC, CEDS, and co-presented by Marsha Hudnall, MS, RDN, CD and by Sunny Gold, BA. Together the group will explore how a person who binge eats can move from a very narrow focus on weight to a broader, more holistic focus by changing attitudes and behavior to improve overall health.

In all, this presentation -- and 60 other in-depth lectures and workshops – make up the 5-day program at the 31st annual iaedp Symposium in Las Vegas at the Green Valley Resort from March 22 – 26. The complete program line-up can be found at http://www.iaedp.com.

According to Dr. Anderson, mindfulness-based interventions that increase autonomy and competence in their relationship with food and body are key points that will be covered during the discussion. Presentation participants will learn personal insights, professional protocols and a theoretical process for shifting their clients’ focus to recovery without invalidating the very real experience of a person of size in our culture.

About the iaedp Foundation: Established in 1985, iaedp is recognized for its excellence in providing education and training standards to an international multidisciplinary group of healthcare treatment providers who treat the full spectrum of eating disorder problems, from anorexia to bulimia to binge eating and obesity. The organization offers a rigorous certification process for those who wish to receive specialized credentials in their work with people with eating disorders. For more information about iaedp, visit http://www.iaedp.com.

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Susan Lomelino
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