Whether Glamping or Roughing It: Keeping Ticks and Other Bugs and Wildlife from Crashing Your Campsite

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Bug Busters offers “Camping 101” tips for a pest-free excursion.

Coming into direct contact with certain insects and wildlife has its risks. The best bet is to avoid contact with these pests and animals as much as possible.

Camping is certainly one of summer’s most beloved activities, yet venturing into nature can have its dangers when it involves coming into contact with harmful insects and company. To keep this pastime an enjoyable one, Bug Busters reminds camping enthusiasts to implement proper precautions when taking on the great outdoors. Ticks in particular are common camping companions sine they live in tall grass and wooded areas, waiting to grab onto passing hosts for feeding. Anyone spending time outdoors should be committed to protecting themselves against these pests because although they are small in size, the diseases they can pass on from a bite are quite dangerous.

“Appreciating nature is part of the camping experience, but admiring it in a safe and responsible way is best for a more enjoyable camping trip,” says Bug Busters Chief Operating Officer Court Parker. “Coming into direct contact with certain insects and wildlife has its risks. Mosquitoes and ticks, for example, are vector pests that feed on blood and can transmit serious illnesses such as West Nile virus, Zika, Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain Fever through their bites. And, wildlife could become aggressive if they feel threatened, while animals such as raccoons and bats could be potential carriers of rabies. The best bet is to avoid contact with these animals as much as possible.”

To help keep the campsite a bug- and animal-free zone, Bug Busters recommends adventurers take note of these tips:

  • Ahead of camping, apply insect repellent containing an EPA-registered active ingredient such as DEET or Picaridin, and repeat applications according to the product label.
  • Wear long sleeves, pants, socks and closed toe shoes to help avoid mosquito and tick bites. Choose light colored clothing that makes it easier to spot ticks and other insects. Do a thorough check after hiking in woods or tall grasses.
  • Yellowjackets and other stinging insects are attracted to fragrances from shampoo, perfume and candles — not to mention food and drink. Avoid using scented items and pour beverages into clear plastic cups rather than drinking from cans.
  • Prior to camping, check tent materials and repair any holes that can serve as points of entry. Keep tents closed at all times unless going in or out.
  • Keep all food and beverages packed in secure coolers and containers. Seal utensils and dishware immediately after use.
  • Dispose of beverage bottles and cans in tightly closed garbage receptacles. Keep garbage containers sealed and away from the sleeping grounds.
  • Do not attempt to feed, lure or pet wild animals.

For more information on pest prevention for all seasons, please visit bugbustersusa.com. For further details on scheduling an interview with a Bug Busters expert who can share ever more creepy crawly facts and pest-prevention ideas, please contact court(at)bugbustersusa(dot)com or 1-800-210-6262.

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Bug Busters has been family owned and operated since 1984 and is committed to providing top-notch residential and commercial pest control services in the Southeast. While offering the most effective pest control services available, Bug Busters is dedicated to doing so with respect for the environment. The company focuses on the control, removal and monitoring of all types of crawling and flying pests including mosquitoes, rodents, bed bugs, termites, spiders and more. Bug Busters stresses the importance of knowing customers personally and offering thorough and tailored service with a vow to excellence in the products and services that it provides.

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