Dr. Amy Brodsky's Pediatric Sun Protection Foundation Assists in Safe Sun Legislations Ahead of National Melanoma Month

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Congress successfully submitted House Resolution #282

Today, Congress successfully submitted House Resolution #282, which takes steps to address the importance of substantially reducing melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer through education by underscoring the dangers of childhood sun exposure. This resolution was the result of a collaboration between the American Academy of Dermatology and Pediatric Sun Protection Foundation, Congressman Charlie Dent (PA-15) on behalf of the Skin Cancer Caucus and along with Representatives David Joyce (OH-14), Carolyn Maloney (NY-12), Rosa DeLauro (CT-3), Evan Jenkins (WV-3), and Jim Cooper (TN-5), and dermatologists across the United States. The resolution engages three key initiatives:

  • To change our understanding of sun exposure and ultraviolet damage, including a shift in recognizing what natural, healthy, attractive skin looks like for a diversity of backgrounds
  • To encourage state, local and community initiatives to support parents, teachers, camp counselors and child-care professionals to take measures against preventing sunburns in the minors they care for
  • To exempt sunscreen from over the counter medicine bans in schools, allowing students to carry and use sunscreen without physician approval

“I am thrilled that we are finally addressing the long-term dangers of sun exposure in children, which too frequently leads to melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers later in life,” said Dr. Amy Brodsky, a mother, dermatologist and the president of the Pediatric Sun Protection Foundation (PSPF) as well as a member of the American Academy of Dermatology Association, which represents more than 13,500 dermatologists worldwide. “On behalf of the Pediatric Sun Protection Foundation, I applaud the introduction of this resolution and support the efforts of Rep. Dent and his Congressional colleagues to further our mission of reducing skin cancer.”

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. While the prevalence of other cancers is decreasing, melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers are among the fastest-growing cancers in the country. Children and adolescents are particularly at risk for ultraviolet radiation skin damage – their skin hasn’t fully developed and their skin cells are dividing at an accelerated pace compared with adults. People who experience five or more blistering sunburns between ages 15 and 20 increase their risk of melanoma by 80 percent and non-melanoma skin cancer by 68 percent.

Dr. Amy Brodsky will be in Washington, D.C. for National Melanoma Monday, the first Monday of May. She is available for interviews as her schedule allows.

About PSPF

The Pediatric Sun Protection Foundation’s mission is to prevent skin cancer by educating children and caretakers about the dangers of childhood sun exposure. This philanthropic endeavor was founded by renowned dermatologist, Dr. Amy Brodsky, in 2012.

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