Breakthrough Research Studies are Unveiled at the MDS Foundation 14th International Symposium on Myelodysplastic Syndromes

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The MDS Foundation, the largest international patient advocacy organization dedicated to finding a cure for myelodysplastic syndromes, is holding its 14th International Symposium on Myelodysplastic Syndromes in Valencia Spain May 3-6, 2017. More than 150 research projects are being unveiled during the 20+ scientific sessions, workshops and patient forums.

The MDS Foundation, the largest international patient advocacy organization dedicated to finding a cure for myelodysplastic syndromes, is holding its 14th International Symposium on Myelodysplastic Syndromes in Valencia Spain May 3-6, 2017. Over 1200 researchers, clinicians, and patients are attending the scientific meeting. More than 150 research projects are being unveiled during the 20+ scientific sessions, workshops and patient forums.

Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) are a group of diverse bone marrow disorders in which the bone marrow does not produce enough healthy blood cells. MDS is often referred to as a “bone marrow failure disorder.” MDS is primarily a disease of the elderly (most patients are older than age 65), but MDS can affect younger patients as well. Approximately 10-15,000 patients are diagnosed with MDS in the United States each year. Low blood cell counts are the hallmark feature of MDS and are responsible for the symptoms that MDS patients experience — fatigue, shortness of breath, infection, spontaneous bleeding, or easy bruising. Additionally, approximately 30% of patients with MDS will develop acute leukemia.

The Tito Bastianello Award recognizes the most promising research projects at the meeting. Dr. Yoshihiro Hayashi, from the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, demonstrated that HIF1A signaling is a central pathobiologic mediator of MDS, establishing it as a potential new target for treatment. Dr. Stephen Chung, from the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, presented an analysis of the transcriptional response of MDS stem cells to therapy at single cell resolution. Dr. Verna Adema, from the Cleveland Clinic, reported on the mutational signature and clonal architecture of low risk MDS with the genetic deletion of 5q. Dr. Martin Wermke, from the Dresden University of Medicine, explained that labile plasma iron predicts for survival in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell-transplantation based on the prospective multicenter German-Austrian ALLIVE trial.

About MDS Foundation:

The MDS Foundation, Inc. (MDSF) is an international organization devoted to the support and education of patients and healthcare providers with innovative research in the fields of MDS and related myeloid neoplasms in order to accelerate progress leading to the control and cure of these diseases. By building an international community of physicians, nurses, researchers, and patients, the MDSF will make potentially curative therapies available for all patients. Over a half-million individuals visited the MDSF website or participated in live patient forums to gain information about MDS in 2016. Over $300,000 in research funds have been distributed to young investigators over the past 5 years to advance scientific knowledge and 174 MDS Foundation Centers of Excellence for treatment and research have been established.

Headquartered in Yardville NJ the MDSF is a publicly supported organization, exempt from federal income tax under section 501(C)(3) of the IRS code. http://www.mds-foundation.org

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Tracey Iraca
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