SciStarter Encourages Girl Scouts to Become Citizen Scientists through New STEM Programming

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Girl Scouts of the USA and SciStarter announce collaboration to encourage girls to engage in authentic scientific research through citizen science projects on SciStarter.

Girl Scouts is thrilled to collaborate with SciStarter on new citizen science programming, which will allow girls around the country to substantively contribute to and impact research that professional scientists are conducting.

SciStarter and Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) are teaming up to encourage girls to pursue STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) with new “Think Like a Citizen Scientist” programming (see https://scistarter.com/girlscouts/info). Citizen science connects everyday people to research and scientists from a variety of disciplines.

“Girl Scouts is thrilled to collaborate with SciStarter on new citizen science programming, which will allow girls around the country to substantively contribute to and impact research that professional scientists are conducting,” said GSUSA CEO Sylvia Acevedo. “Connecting Girl Scouts with SciStarter’s enriching platform further enhances our engaging and comprehensive STEM programming. Girls who participate in the ‘Think Like a Citizen Scientist’ series will be fully immersed in the scientific process—some for the first time―as well as gain a broadened understanding that science is for everyone.”

“Girl Scout programs inspire and support girls to take action on an issue, and make their efforts sustainable,” said Darlene Cavalier, Founder of SciStarter and Professor of Practice at Arizona State University. “We are excited to help mobilize Girl Scouts across the country to advance scientific research while applying new SciStarter 2.0 analytics tools so the Girl Scouts of the USA can understand what types of citizen science projects appeal to girls, and use that information to continue to offer even more relevant and impactful STEM programming for girls.”

The “Think Like a Citizen Scientist” Journey—a form of Girl Scout programming that includes several troop meetings dedicated to the topic—begins in a Girl Scout troop and online with SciStarter. A troop learns how to make and share careful observations to contribute to research efforts led by scientists at NASA, US Geological Survey, college research labs, and more. Next, the troop decides how to take action: they discuss the scientific research they’ve done and identify a related problem, come up with a creative and sustainable solution, put a team plan into action, and document their project on SciStarter. The girls have now earned an award for completing the “Think Like a Citizen Scientist” Journey!

About the New Girl Scout Programming
Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) today releases new programming in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) and the outdoors, areas girls are not typically encouraged to explore outside of Girl Scouting. Through hands-on and age-appropriate experiences for girls as young as five, Girl Scouts is addressing the lack of exposure many girls have to STEM. In fact, Girl Scouts are almost twice as likely as non–Girl Scouts to participate in STEM (60 percent versus 35 percent). The new Girl Scout programming builds girls’ skills and encourages their interest in STEM fields. For more information about the new badges, to join or volunteer, visit http://www.girlscouts.org.

About SciStarter
SciStarter (https://scistarter.com) enables people from all walks of life to contribute to science through informal recreational activities and formal research efforts. The website creates a shared space where scientists can connect with people interested in working on or learning about joint research projects. SciStarter features 1,500 searchable citizen science projects and recruits participants through collaborations with Discover Magazine and Astronomy Magazine, PBS, the National Science Teachers Association, Public Library of Science, Pop Warner Youth Scholars, Girl Scouts of the USA, and more.

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Claire LaBeaux
SciStarter
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