ABMSP Podiatrists Urge Vigilance Against Late-Summer Foot Fungus

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September is a particularly opportune time to ramp up your defenses against foot and toenail fungus. Throughout the summer, warm-weather footwear like sandals and flip flops leave our feet exposed to potentially harmful bacteria.

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The American Board of Multiple Specialties in Podiatry (ABMSP) has issued a rallying cry to Americans to watch for the discomforts and hidden dangers of foot fungus, particularly in the warm months of

“We see problems related to fungal infections becoming more widespread in late summer months,” said Kenneth B. Rehm, D.P.M., Diplomate of the ABMSP. “And the problems are not limited to patients with diabetes or ongoing podiatric ailments."

The American Board of Multiple Specialties in Podiatry (ABMSP) has issued a rallying cry to Americans to watch for the discomforts and hidden dangers of foot fungus, particularly in the warm months of late summer. From young athletes to senior citizens, everyone is at risk for developing fungal infections on the feet or toenails, the Board says. Patients with underlying health concerns, especially diabetes-related foot wounds, are especially at risk. But vigilant inspection of the skin of the feet and regular consultation with an ABMSP-certified podiatrist can help prevent fungal infections from colonizing your feet.

September is a particularly opportune time to ramp up your defenses against foot and toenail fungus. Throughout the summer, warm-weather footwear like sandals and flip flops leave our feet exposed to potentially harmful bacteria. At the same time, rising temperatures and sweaty feet create the perfect environment for fungal infections to develop.

Patients in treatment for diabetic foot wounds are particularly vulnerable, said Kenneth B. Rehm, D.P.M., Diplomate of the ABMSP. “We see problems related to fungal infections becoming more widespread in late summer months,” said Rehm. “And the problems are not limited to patients with diabetes or ongoing podiatric ailments. Fungal infections hit kids, teens, adults, and seniors, and if left untreated they can lead to serious complications. But there are so many steps you can take to avoid these types of infection. Like always in foot health, I tell my patients they must be attentive and motivated to care for their feet.”

Rehm advises that patients should wash their feet regularly, wear breathable footwear, change socks often, keep toenails short and dry, and never go barefoot in public places. An ABMSP-certified podiatrist, said Rehm, can examine your feet and recommend an antifungal spray or powder, if necessary.

About ABMSP
The American Board of Multiple Specialties in Podiatry was originally organized by podiatrists for the purpose of granting board certification to office-based and ambulatory foot surgeons. Incorporated in 1986 as the American Institute of Foot Medicine (AIFM), the name was changed in 1992 to better reflect its mission. The Board now offers certification to qualified podiatrists in all areas of podiatric practice: Primary Care in Podiatric Medicine; Foot and Ankle Surgery, both in a hospital setting and in outpatient facilities; Prevention and Treatment of Diabetic Foot Wounds and Foot Wear; and Limb Preservation and Salvage. The Board’s certification examinations have been approved for reimbursement by The United States Department of Veterans Affairs as an educational benefit for eligible veterans. The American Board of Multiple Specialties in Podiatry is accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) under the ISO International Standards ANSI/ISO/IEC/17024:2003 for Accreditation for Bodies Operating Certification of Persons. For more information, visit http://www.abmsp.org.

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