Coachman Energy Operating Company (CEOC) Releases Initial Six-months Results of Secondary Oil Recovery Project in Barton County, Kansas

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Low salinity waterflood expected to yield one hundred thousand barrels of new reserves, says CEOC Chief Operating Officer Randall Kenworthy.

Coachman Energy Operating waterflood proves successful in Kansas.

Coachman Energy Operating waterflood proves successful in Kansas.

“Since moving into the Mid-Continent region in early 2015, Coachman Energy Operating Company has spent significant resources identifying secondary recovery opportunities throughout our acreage. Now, our efforts are starting to pay off,” said Randall “Randy” Kenworthy, CEOC’s Chief Operating Officer.

Coachman Energy Operating Company LLC (CEOC) today announced the initial results of a waterflood project that began in mid-September 2017 after the successful conversion of the Huslig #1 into an enhanced recovery water injection well. At the six-month mark, the three-well Huslig field is producing over 25 barrels of oil per day and rising, up from 8 barrels a day prior to start. The Huslig waterflood, which should reach peak daily production in twelve to eighteen months, is expected to recover at least one additional barrel of oil for every two barrels of primary recovered oil, adding over one hundred thousand barrels of new reserves.

“Since moving into the Mid-Continent region in early 2015, Coachman Energy Operating Company has spent significant resources identifying secondary recovery opportunities throughout our acreage. Now, our efforts are starting to pay off,” said Randall “Randy” Kenworthy, CEOC’s Chief Operating Officer. “All in, the Huslig waterflood represents a capital investment of under a third of the cost needed to drill and complete a single well in the area, not to mention bypassing the risk of drilling a dry hole. Now, with prices climbing over the $60 per barrel mark, each additional ultra-low cost barrel produced through this waterflood represents the opportunity for significantly enhanced project returns.”

Waterflooding is a secondary recovery method where water is introduced into an existing pressure-depleted, multi-well field thereby increasing pressure to displace remaining oil and move it into the wellbore. In addition, the Huslig is a low salinity waterflood, which is expected to recover even more oil than a traditional waterflood. The University of Wyoming conducted the pioneering research on low salinity waterflooding, with additional research and recent implementation in the Middle East and other oil regions.

Discovered in 2009 in Barton County, Kansas, the Huslig field is a small, three-well pool primarily in the Lansing-Kansas City carbonate formation, having produced ~180 thousand barrels to date under primary recovery. It has ~40+ kbbls of remaining primary reserves.

The Huslig waterflood is the first of several waterfloods Coachman Energy Operating Company has planned in Kansas and Nebraska between now and 2020.

About Coachman Energy Operating Company
Coachman Energy Operating Company LLC (CEOC) is a Denver-based independent oil and natural gas producer with reserves and significant running room in the Mid Continent’s Central Kansas Uplift and Western Colorado’s Piceance Basin. CEOC oversees engineering, drilling & completion, geology, reservoir analysis, and project management services with the goal of maximizing asset performance and value on behalf of its working interest partners.

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