Africa Decrease in Food Availability, Increases Violence

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New research released in new AJAE article

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Policymakers should focus more on how to improve access to food in developed states, rather than focusing on whether more or less food is being produced in these countries

Rising temperatures and lack of water hinder the chances for growing viable food options. It’s previously been believed that low food security in Africa could lead to a civil war. But a new article published in American Journal of Agricultural Economics (AJAE) says that the on-going conflict in Africa is driven by higher yields, not scarcity.

AAEA’s professional journal the AJAE, recently published a new article from Ore Koren from Dartmouth College and Indiana University, Bloomington entitled “Food Abundance and Violent Conflict in Africa.”

The article proves that a civil war resulting from a food scarcity crisis is inconsistent with history. Koren demonstrates that the strong emphasis on climate change as a universal driver of conflict is inaccurate, and ignores vast historical evidence connecting armed conflict and abundance.

When asked about his findings, Koren said, “Policymakers should focus more on how to improve access to food in developed states, rather than focusing on whether more or less food is being produced in these countries.”

If you are interested in setting up an interview with Ore Koren, please contact Allison Scheetz in the AAEA Business Office.

ABOUT AAEA: Established in 1910, the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association (AAEA) is the leading professional association for agricultural and applied economists, with 2,500 members in more than 60 countries. Members of the AAEA work in academic or government institutions as well as in industry and not-for-profit organizations, and engage in a variety of research, teaching, and outreach activities in the areas of agriculture, the environment, food, health, and international development. The AAEA publishes two journals, the American Journal of Agricultural Economics and Applied Economic Perspectives & Policy, as well as the online magazine Choices. To learn more, visit http://www.aaea.org.

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Allison Scheetz
@AAEA_Economics
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