National Police Association Calls for “Lloyd’s Law,” Asks Pres. Trump to Back Adding Police Officers to the Federal Hate Crimes Law in Response to Cop Killer's Acquittal.

Share Article

The National Police Association is calling on President Trump to propose expanding the current Federal hate crimes law to include law enforcement officers in response to the recent acquittal of an admitted cop killer by a Pennsylvania jury.

News Image

The National Police Association is calling on President Trump to propose expanding the current Federal hate crimes law to include law enforcement officers in response to the recent acquittal of an admitted cop killer by a Pennsylvania jury.

November 28, 2015, St. Clair Township, Pennsylvania, P.D. Patrolman Lloyd Reed was responding to a domestic disturbance call when he was shot and killed. When Reed arrived at the scene of the incident the suspect was leaving the residence with a rifle slung over his shoulder. Patrolman Reed issued commands for the suspect to drop his weapon. Gunfire was exchanged and both Patrolman Reed and the suspect were shot. Patrolman Reed was transported to a hospital where he subsequently was pronounced dead. The suspect fled the scene and was arrested hours later by Pennsylvania state police.

February 16, 2018 a Westmoreland County Common Pleas Court jury found Ray Shelter, Jr. Not guilty of Reed’s murder. Not guilty despite Shelter admitting that he shot St. Clair Township Police Officer Lloyd Reed while the officer was responding to a 911 call made by Shelter’’s girlfriend. Witnesses testified that Reed ordered Shelter to drop his rifle, and fired when he did not comply. Shelter shot at Reed three times, hitting and killing him with a shot that impacted outside Reed’’s body armor.

Shelter testified he did not know Reed was a police officer.

The Friday after the verdict a vigil was held to honor Officer Reed and his family. Vigil organizer Jessica Lovejoy told KDKA-TV News, the verdict was a punch in the stomach.

The Pennsylvania FOP released a statement advising: "An innocent man doesn't flee the scene of a murder, lead police on a six-hour manhunt, and get rid of their clothing and weapon. This is an absolute tragedy for Officer Reed's family, his department and police officers everywhere. It's unconscionable that a jury did not do the right thing in this senseless act of killing a police officer. A brave hero’’s family is now left to relive this horror over again without receiving the justice they deserve and that his ultimate sacrifice demands.”

Officer Reed’s widow, Rose, issued a written statement: "The justice system that my husband was honored to protect and serve, did not protect and serve him. Such an injustice for all the years he gave to help and protect all of us, the justice system and peers of the jury failed him. Apparently they heard a different story from the rest of us, and believed it. I did not know what really happened that night till the trial, but he admitted it on the stand. If he was not guilty then why, why did he run!! Not only was I hoping for justice for my husband, but I kept saying how the outcome of this trial was so, so important for police officers in the future. The murders are gonna claim it was self defense. Now I cannot fight any kind of justice for my husband, it's done, it's over!"

Retired police lieutenant and Blue Lives Matter spokesman Randy Sutton concluded the moronic jury couldn't have had a combined IQ in the double digits.

What no observers could call for however, was the federal prosecution of the admitted cop killer. Currently police officers do not have a protected status under under the federal hate crimes law.

Mr. President, we urge you and your administration to propose legislation to correct this oversight in the name of fallen Officer Lloyd Reed for his family, his friends, and the next law enforcement officer whose admitted killer is acquitted in a state court.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

MEDIA CONTACT
Visit website