Literacy Design Collaborative Releases New White Paper Developed with Literacy Expert P. David Pearson to Teach Argumentation

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The Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC) is pleased to announce the release of a new LDC white paper on teaching argumentation, developed with renowned literacy expert P. David Pearson and the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Education.

The Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC) is pleased to announce the release of a new LDC white paper on teaching argumentation, developed with renowned literacy expert P. David Pearson and the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Education.

Since 2012, the collaboration between LDC and Dr. Pearson’s team has generated trailblazing work at the intersection of research and practice, weaving deep academic expertise into the daily work of teaching professionals. In 2018, the collaboration will focus on argumentation, due to its pivotal position in curriculum reform efforts such as the Common Core State Standards, the Next Generation Science Standards, and the College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards. “The ability to make a reasoned case for ideas is the surest pathway for preparing students to succeed in college and career settings and to participate in a democratic society,” said Dr. P. David Pearson, Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley.

For this release, Dr. Pearson and his team immersed themselves in the best available research and resources on argumentation and condensed their findings into a handy guide to the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching argument, addressing topics such as the differences among argument, opinion, and persuasion; common features of academic arguments across disciplines; and unique features of disciplinary arguments within history, science, and English language arts. For each discipline, it explores the kinds of topics and questions that generate arguments, the kinds of evidence valued by experts in the field, and the structures and rhetoric used to develop well-reasoned arguments.

The paper also includes a compact set of practical resources for creating and scaffolding literacy-based argumentation assignments in K–12 classrooms, including a glossary of argumentation terms, an annotated bibliography of public, free resources for teaching argumentation, examples of high quality disciplinary curriculum developed by Battelle Education and Facing History and Ourselves, and learning progressions to guide appropriate scaffolding of argumentation assignments across grade levels.

This paper is the first in a series of LDC argumentation tools to come in 2018. The 2018 LDC LEARN platform will include disciplinary cheat sheets; disciplinary argumentation module templates—including those critical skills lists and instructional sequences; and professional learning experiences to support using the tools. Contact LDC for a demo or meeting.

“This paper is incredibly timely—every day we are faced with images and stories of various forms of argumentation—political, social, economic. Systems are mightily trying to figure out how to prepare their students for active citizenry. This paper provides background, direction, and resources for preparing students for the most important skills—making, listening to, and responding to arguments, ” said Dr. Suzanne Simons, Chief Academic Officer for Literacy Design Collaborative.

To read the full paper, please visit ldc.org/resources.

About the Literacy Design Collaborative
The Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC) is a national network of partners and 75,000+ teachers committed to changing the way students experience reading and writing in schools. LDC.org offers a variety of school transformation services, including curriculum audit and mapping; flexible blended professional learning sequences, progress monitoring data, and quality curriculum vetting with the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning and Equity. LDC also offers free teacher-created vetted tasks, lessons, and short units that help teachers effectively teach reading, writing, speaking, and listening in all subjects. http://www.LDC.org

About P. David Pearson
P. David Pearson is an emeritus faculty member in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley, where he served as Dean from 2001–2010. His current research focuses on literacy history and policy. He also holds an appointment as a Professor of the Graduate School and is the Evelyn Lois Corey Emeritus Chair in Instructional Science. He has been active in professional organizations, serving the International Reading Association (IRA) and the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) in many capacities (including the IRA Board of Directors), both the National Reading Conference (NRC) and The National Conference of Research in English as President, and the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education as a member of the Board. He currently serves as the Chair of IRA’s Literacy Research Panel.

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Jennifer Bowman
@LitDesignCollab
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