Light it Up Blue for Autism Awareness

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On April 2 The Shape of Behavior will celebrate World Autism Awareness Day

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Autism affects one in 68 children born today and one in 54 boys.

On April 2, people, businesses, and monuments around the world will be clad in blue to recognize World Autism Awareness Day. From the Empire State Building in New York City to Christ the Redeemer of Corcovado, Brazil more than 200 buildings all over the world will “light it up blue” in an effort to raise awareness of autism.

Autism Speaks’s “Light It up Blue” campaign encourages people to learn the signs of autism and promote awareness by wearing blue. It is more than just one day; the month of April is Autism Awareness month.

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a disorder that appears in early childhood before the age of three. The general symptoms are repetitive behaviors, restricted interests, cognitive impairment and social delays. Autism affects one in 68 children born today and one in 54 boys.

The Shape of Behavior offers treatment including but not limited to early intervention in the form of full-time center-based applied behavior analysis (ABA) day treatment for individuals with autism and other developmental delays. ABA is an evidence-based treatment credited for many success stories, and it has aided in improving the lives of countless individuals struggling with autism.

April 2 was declared World Autism Awareness Day on December 18, 2007 by the United Nations General Assembly with the goal of calling attention to autism, a disorder that affects millions around the world. Autism Speaks started “Light It up Blue” as a way to spread the word about the disorder.

As research continues knowledge of autism grows and better programs and services are becoming available for individuals with autism, but there is still room for improvement and more research must be conducted in order to determine the cause(s) of this disorder.

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Audrey Borges
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