Issue Brief Examines the Impact of the Baby Boomer Generation on the U.S. Healthcare System

The Center for Health Affairs' February 2014 publication, Bracing for the Boomers: Addressing the Healthcare and Workforce Challenges of a Generation, takes a look at how the aging and retirement of the baby boomer generation is affecting the healthcare industry in the United States.

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Cleveland, Ohio (PRWEB) March 04, 2014

The Center’s February 2014 publication, Bracing for the Boomers: Addressing the Healthcare and Workforce Challenges of a Generation, takes a look at how the aging and retirement of the baby boomer generation is affecting the healthcare industry in the United States. Estimated to comprise nearly 25 percent of the nation’s population, this generation will undoubtedly continue to shape the landscape of the country as is has for nearly seven decades. The Center's baby boomer publication highlights current population and workforce estimates, and explores the various ways in which boomers are expected to utilize the healthcare system in the future.

When the first of the baby boomer generation turned 65 just three years ago, the national spotlight was aimed at this group. Questions regarding the long-term financial outlook for social insurance programs such as Medicare and Social Security were immediately raised, and economists and policymakers alike were tasked with ensuring their viability. Luckily, with major policy changes from congress and innovative models to deliver healthcare services to the aging, the outlook for the baby boomer generation has never been better. Allocating additional healthcare dollars for certain long-term care options and extending the solvency of the Medicare trust fund are just a few changes that have been made in preparation for the expanding number of people age 65 and older.

For more information about the Issue Brief discussing the baby boomer generation and its impact on the healthcare system, please contact Tony Gutowski, public policy development manager via email or at 216.255.3610.

To browse related information and resources cited in this publication, visit The Center's Baby Boomer Health Needs Pinterest board.

A full list of The Center's publications can be found on its website along with a wide range of resources covering a variety of health policy issues.

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As the leading advocate for Northeast Ohio hospitals, The Center for Health Affairs provides members with vital services and resources aimed at enhancing the region’s healthcare community. The Center delivers on this goal by focusing its efforts on areas that benefit from a regional approach: Healthcare Workforce; Emergency Preparedness; Public Policy & Advocacy; Finance & Reimbursement; and Community Initiatives. With a rich history as the Northeast Ohio hospital association, dating back to 1916, The Center serves as the collective voice of hospitals and the source for Northeast Ohio hospital and healthcare information. As leaders, we continuously scan the periphery, looking for opportunities to enhance the region’s workforce, better prepare our hospitals for an emergency, and increase the region’s wage index. And because of our business affiliation with CHAMPS Healthcare, we have the resources to provide a broad level of professional services to our members. The Center, located in downtown Cleveland, is proud to advocate on behalf of 38 acute-care hospitals and two long-term acute-care hospitals in six counties. For more, visit chanet.org.