New Book Challenges Lou Gerstner’s Legacy and IBM’s 21st Century Roadmaps

Author Peter E. Greulich expects company’s leadership to rediscover what made IBM great: a corporate constitution based on respect for the individual, service to the customer and the pursuit of excellence.

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A View from Beneath the Dancing Elephant - Front Cover

The twenty-first-century IBM has misplaced Respect, Service and Excellence. It has lost its culture, its constitution and its way.

Austin, TX (PRWEB) August 05, 2014

MBI Concepts Corp. today announced A View from Beneath the Dancing Elephant, a new book by author and speaker Peter E. Greulich that serves as a counterpoint to former IBM CEO Louis V. Gerstner’s 2002 memoir, Who Says Elephants Can’t Dance?

The book examines how one of the most respected corporations of the 20th century transitioned into one struggling with employee attrition, disappointed customers and a sinking reputation.

Greulich, who spent 30 years at IBM, credits Gerstner with financially saving the company, but asserts that he never realized how much of his success came from accidentally tapping into an 80-year-old culture he never truly understood. That culture, created by the company’s founders, the Watsons, was codified as the IBM Basic Beliefs:

  •     Respect for the Individual
  •     Service to the Customer
  •     The Pursuit of Excellence

Greulich believes that IBM’s 21st century leadership has lost sight of these beliefs, and that for IBM to regain its 20th century stature, it must rediscover its heritage.

According to the consultant Marcia Daszko, Greulich’s book is more than just a case study: it “addresses a major issue facing America and the world: the lack of leadership and the shift from invigorating cultures to work environments full of bureaucracy, frequent layoffs, and executive arrogance. Peter’s call to action for leaders to lead is mandatory. Will they rise to the challenge?”

A View from Beneath the Dancing Elephant is available worldwide on Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Smashwords and local book stores such as Barnes and Noble. For more information, visit the book website at http://www.beneaththedancingelephant.com/a-view-from-beneath-the-dancing-elephant.html.

Paperback: ISBN-13: 978-0-9833734-6-9, Price: $14.99
Amazon Kindle: ISBN-13: 978-0-9833734-7-6, Price: $9.99
iTunes, Google Play or Barnes and Noble EPUB: ISBN-13: 978-0-9833734-8-3, Price: $9.99

About the Author
Peter E. Greulich is the president of MBI Concepts Corporation, which creates corporate environments that encourage employee ownership. He spent 30 years at IBM as a salesman, brand manager, worldwide product/market manager and sales instructor, and has interviewed thousands of IBMers worldwide. This is his second book about IBM.

Greulich will be taking speaking engagements and book tours starting September 1, 2014.

# # #

Contact:
Peter Greulich
pgreulic@mbiconcepts.com
http://www.mbiconcepts.com/press.html
+1 (512) 762-1620


Contact

Attachments

Thomas J. Watson Sr. wanted a management team that was close to IBM's employee-owners. Thomas J. Watson Sr. wanted a management team that was close to IBM's employee-owners.

In the 20th Century IBM, the first-line manager was given the authority and autonomy to do what was right for the business. The 20th Century IBM was full of stories of heroism, courage and daring in performing acts of true service.


IBM U. K. employees burned their Quarter Century Club certificates outside IBM laboratories. IBM U. K. employees burned their Quarter Century Club certificates outside IBM laboratories.

In the constant pursuit of ever-better earnings per share, IBM’s culture of trust and confidence took a worldwide pounding. After using the U.S. as its proving ground, IBM’s Finance and Human Resources departments reached across the pond.


The 20th Century IBM kept elephants out of the room during during Opinion Survey Feedback Sessions. The 20th Century IBM kept elephants out of the room during during Opinion Survey Feedback Sessions.

Opinion Surveys guaranteed IBM managers a very personal self-analysis. They ensured that IBM’s leaders were strong and powerful yet coachable; the rest were returned to non-management positions. IBM's 20th Century leadership trusted its employee-owners.


This is a graphic of IBM's Corporate Constitution. There are three rectangles beside each other: the first says respect is true north; the second, service is the destination; the third, excellence is the best path. IBM's Corporate Constitution based on Respect, Service and Excellent.

IBM's Corporate Constitution was based on: Respect for the Individual, Service to the Customer, and the Pursuit of Excellence. The Goal was Individual Thought and Action.


This is a graphic that shows Respect in bold letters and True North in parenthesis. There is a map a the top of the graphic that shows a map with many small x's on the map. Respect for the Individual

Respect was true north. It was never the objective. It was rarely the direction traveled. It was the place from which everyone oriented him- or herself on the corporate topographical map — that immovable reference point for setting one’s personal compass.


Similar to the Respect graphic, this is a graphic with Service in bold and Destination in parenthesis. The map from Respect has been brought over with the small x's but now a big bold red X is in the upper right hand corner, a symbol of the objective. Service to the Customer

Respect was true north but Service was the destination. Establishing an objective based on Service gave the individual purpose and the team focus; but when that objective was based on True Service, something magnificent happened — a family spirit evolved.


Similar to the Service graphic, this is a graphic adds Excellence in bold and Best Path in parenthesis. The map from Service has been continued but now each of the x's is symbolized as pursing the best path with lines to the objective. The Pursuit of Excellence

The Pursuit of Excellence ensured that change was continual, sustained and culturally ingrained. Excellence was the agent of change; through it IBMers sought out the best path. It was this belief that sustained IBM's Wild Ducks.


This is a full page image of the front and back cover with spine for the book A View from Beneath the Dancing Elephant. A View from Beneath the Dancing Elephant - Full Book Image

A View from Beneath the Dancing Elephant - Full Book Image (front/back/spine)


This is a picture of Peter E. Greulich, CEO of MBI Concepts Corporation and author of books on IBM. Peter E. Greulich Public Photo

Peter E. Greulich, CEO of MBI Concepts Corporatoin and author of books on IBM.